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27 results for Food industry and trade
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Record #:
3026
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Founded in Charlotte in 1913, snack food maker Lance once had the South to itself. Now operating in 37 states, the company faces competition from companies like Frito Lay and, strangely, is a wealthy company in financial trouble.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 16 Issue 7, July 1996, p26-29,31,33,35,37-38,40, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3251
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Meat snacks may not be everyone's favorite snack food, but good marketing and advertising have made GoodMark Foods' premier meat snack, Slim Jim, a household name and a product with three straight years of double-digit growth.
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Record #:
3328
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Ron E. Doggett, Chairman and CEO of GoodMark Foods, Inc., has led his company to first place in meat snacks production and marketing. The company, known for its Slim Jim snack, produces forty percent of the market.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 55 Issue 6, June 1997, p8-10, por
Record #:
4328
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Although he is in competition with fast-food giants like Hardees and Bojangles, Maurice Jennings has built Biscuitville into a $30 million business since it began in 1975. The company does not do giant franchises. Nor has it gone nationwide; all but five of the stores are within an hour's drive of the headquarters in Winston-Salem. Biscuitville sticks close to its biscuit theme and cuts out a dinner by closing at 2 p.m. Staying with these approaches has kept the company in dough.
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Record #:
7480
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North Carolina's food producers are expanding their products to many parts of the world. Wright discusses a number of companies and their products, including Carolina Cookie Company, Mt. Olive Pickle Company, Smithfield Foods, Atkinson Milling Company, and Bertie County Peanuts.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 11, Nov 2005, p54-56, il
Record #:
10764
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Lance Inc., of Charlotte faces an increase in prices as the manufacturer makes millions in revenue. Owner George McCormick created the nickel-priced snack packs that are sold throughout the state, such as Choc-o-Lunch, Nip-Chee, and Toestee-Chee. The rise in basic food products such as wheat, sugar, and oil have reduced the profit margin for the nickel packs, though company sales have increased by 12 percent in 1967.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 21, Apr 1967, p10
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Record #:
24386
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Preparing meals for airline passengers is big business. Sky Chefs Inc., one of the nation’s largest airline catering companies, serves flights departing from Raleigh Durham International Airport.
Record #:
27656
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From Morehead City to Asheville, there are a number of unique places in North Carolina to catch delicious midday meals of regional food.
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Record #:
27898
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Students, faculty, and staff at NC State, UNC-Chapel Hill, and Duke are pursuing ways to change the food systems in their communities. These individuals are looking for ways to make systems more fair and reliant on crops and animals raised locally. Student activists are the ones who have taken the lead, pressuring their universities and communities to change their habits and provide them with organic, locally sourced foods from sustainable farms. Universities are beginning to listen and are working with students to adapt to this change.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 13, March 2010, p35-36 Periodical Website
Record #:
27947
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The history of when pimento cheese first appeared, its popularity in North Carolina and the south, and its cultural importance are explored. The Triangle area with Charlotte is the biggest market in the nation for pimento cheese. Ruth’s Salads of Charlotte is the top producer of the cheese in the nation. Pimento cheese gained popularity due to the fact it was cheap to make, tasted good, and convenient to take to work.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 21, May 2010, p21 Periodical Website
Record #:
28116
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The desire to have local and organic food available to students in the Triangle’s college dining halls is increasing. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students recently formed Fair, Local, Organic Food (FLO Flood) to advocate for the issue. The practice of having such food available is normal at Duke University. North Carolina State is beginning to look at ways to make this movement a reality. The food culture and desire of students request different food in dining halls in area universities is explored.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 9, February 2008, p21-23 Periodical Website
Record #:
28135
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Demand is high in the Triangle area for locally raised organic meat and eggs and organic locally produced breads, but there is a lack of organic grain in the state. This lack of organic grain has prenvented small producers from serving the organic foods market. North Carolina State University is attempting to turn this trend around by using two recent grants to promote organic grain production. Local farmers talk about the lack of organic grain in the state and how the NC State program is helping them change that problem.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 19, May 2008, p37 Periodical Website
Record #:
28134
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Roadblocks in the food supply chain prevent much of North Carolina’s agricultural products from being sold in the Triangle area. The Triangle area is better at providing local options than many places, but eating local food takes work on behalf of consumers and suppliers. The lack of infrastructure to help small and mid-sized producers get their food products to local markets is holding is preventing local food options from making it to consumers, but local farmers, agriculture support organizations, and the state government are working to make the process smoother. Examples of the progress are detailed.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 19, May 2008, p33-39 Periodical Website
Record #:
28313
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The vegetable kale has the ability to draw heavy metals from soil, and consequently expose humans to lead. This study measured the concentration of lead in kale commercially obtained in Buncombe County, North Carolina. Although lead intake should be avoided whenever possible, the lead concentrations in these kale samples were detectable but negligible.
Record #:
29710
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Food cooperatives or co-ops emphasize independence and support for the local economy. Many co-ops, including Western North Carolina’s Hendersonville Food Co-op and French Broad Food Co-op, reach out to local producers and collaborate to create supply channels.
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