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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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18 results for Sustainable agriculture
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Record #:
15951
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Until recently, conventional agricultural production was never questioned. But environmentalists and family farm advocates have become concerned with quality of environment and community. Sustainable agriculture, studied under the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE), is an alternative, organic, regenerative approach to agricultural output.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 20 Issue 1, 1995, p5-11, bibl, f
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Record #:
24078
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Bountiful Cities is an all-volunteer organization that works with communities to get their community gardens organized and productive. The organization teaches gardening basics and sustainable agriculture practices.
Record #:
26486
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In North Carolina, pesticide use in crop production is a complex issue. The sustainable agriculture movement is promoting the development of a comprehensive educational program to help farmers select pesticides that will be least injurious to wildlife, and yet permit profits.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 38 Issue 5, Fall 1991, p20-21, il
Record #:
26624
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North Carolina State University scientists are developing new farming methods for developing countries to combat global warming. Slash and burn agriculture particularly in the area of dense tropical rain forests is thought to contribute to the warming trend.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1988, p10, il
Record #:
27323
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To improve the sustainability of its farming methods, residents of Asheville are exploring the uses of aquaponics. The technique combines aquaculture which is fish farming and hydroponics which is growing plants in water. Aquaponics is a method which uses nutrient-rich water provided by fish and their waste to help grow plants which then recycle the clean water back to the fish. Aquaponics uses 90 percent less water than traditional soil farming and prevents the damaging of soil and waterways.
Record #:
27140
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Owner and head chef Teddy Klopf opened the new restaurant Provenance in downtown Raleigh last February. The food is sourced almost exclusively from North Carolina. Klopf stresses the importance of food accessibility and agriculture, and believes that serving local food needs to be the norm.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 19, May 2016, p16-19, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27179
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Jilian and Ross Mickens are rebuilding an abandoned farm called Open Door Farm in Orange County. They aim to teach people the value and practice of sustainable farming. Their effort is part of a larger process of adding youth back into agriculture, an increasingly lost profession.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 22, June 2016, p19-20, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27703
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Mark Hockney owns and operates Tiny Farm in Hillsborough, an 11 acre farm that reimagines what small scale farms are capable of. Hockney has created a business model that focuses on sustainable farming through innovation and long-term planning. Hockney grows organic greens 52 weeks a year and offers his workers above minimum wage, a 401k, and medical insurance.
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Record #:
27898
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Students, faculty, and staff at NC State, UNC-Chapel Hill, and Duke are pursuing ways to change the food systems in their communities. These individuals are looking for ways to make systems more fair and reliant on crops and animals raised locally. Student activists are the ones who have taken the lead, pressuring their universities and communities to change their habits and provide them with organic, locally sourced foods from sustainable farms. Universities are beginning to listen and are working with students to adapt to this change.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 13, March 2010, p35-36 Periodical Website
Record #:
28366
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During the 1960s and 1970s, many in North Carolina and America were a part of the back-to-the-earth movement. The author describes her experience as a middle age adult moving to a commune in the Piedmont area to build a house by hand and live off of the land. She talks of the effect it had on her marriage and how the dream of true self-sufficiency was never reached by anyone in the community. Now, the community is largely changed and the Piedmont’s development has taken a away much of the land the group tried to live with.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 10 Issue 10, March 1992, p10-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
28659
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North Carolina’s college students are finding new ways to support sustainable causes on campus. Students from UNC Pembroke and Edgecombe Community College are highlighted for their promotion of sustainable food source and renewable energy sources.
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Record #:
29033
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Raleigh-based artist, David McConnell, has a new work of art called Infinity Hundred, which stems from varied creative sources including music, mixed media, and a food forest. McConnell incorporated sustainably farmed foods into his art to supplement his income and to improve his son’s asthma. The art project has inspired McConnell to pursue permaculture on a larger level, aspires to teach people about sustainable practices.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 17, May 2017, p19, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29721
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Marc and Marianne Blazar opened a new restaurant at the Orchard Inn in Saluda, North Carolina. The cuisine is New American with an emphasis on sustainable farming, local produce and meats. The Blazars strive to reduce their carbon footprint and promote a healthier lifestyle.
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Record #:
29729
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The nonprofit organization Organic Growers School started from the volunteer efforts of farmers and extension specialists who gathered in 1993 to address the need for region-specific cultivation support for farmers in Western North Carolina. Their twenty-fourth annual Spring Conference will bring people to Asheville for a weekend of classes and workshops on a range of topics related to gardening, farming, permaculture, and sustainable living.
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Record #:
29732
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Living Web Farms is one of many farms and agri-businesses in Western North Carolina focused on providing practical education and inspiration to help people understand how to tend to both the land and themselves. They provide food to the hungry and teach classes in farming, food preparation, and the creation of alternative energy sources.
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