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14 results for McMillan, Alex Frew
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Record #:
1836
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McMillan analyzes initial public offerings (IPOs) of stock in North Carolina, to determine how well the private companies do after going public.
Record #:
2343
Author(s):
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The state's seventy-five largest public companies range from banks to transport companies to makers of collecting cards. However, most of the market value is concentrated in the state's financial institutions - banks, thrifts, and brokerages.
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Record #:
2515
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Although the Lumbee Indians are the state's largest Indian tribe, the federal government does not recognize them as such and grants them little funding. A bill to grant recognition was stalled in the U.S. Congress in 1994.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 15 Issue 10, Oct 1995, p40-44, 46, 48-49, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
3061
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The state's top seventy-five public companies are ranked according to their May, 1996, market value. NationsBank heads a list that includes a number of high-tech and health-care-related companies.
Record #:
3251
Author(s):
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Meat snacks may not be everyone's favorite snack food, but good marketing and advertising have made GoodMark Foods' premier meat snack, Slim Jim, a household name and a product with three straight years of double-digit growth.
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Record #:
3456
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The state's top seventy-five public companies are ranked according to their May, 1997, market value. The top three, NationsBank, First Union, and Wachovia, total a market value of $81 billion, or fifty-four percent of the top 75's total.
Record #:
3818
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's top seventy-five public companies are ranked by their May, 1998, market value. Twenty percent of this list are health-care or high-tech companies. NationsBank ranks No. 1. The market value of 1997's No. 75 company was $76.3 million; that of 1998's No. 75, $113.7 million.
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Record #:
4027
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Abstract:
The state's one hundred largest employers for 1998 range from Food Lion, Inc. with over 34,000 workers, to three that tied with 2,300. The companies are either privately, publicly, or foreign owned. They offer such products and services as yarn, banking, pork processing, and telecommunications.
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Record #:
9645
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Abstract:
McMillan talks about several Chinese workers and how what they do helps shape the state's economy.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 26 Issue 10, Oct 2006, p70-74, 76-83, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24306
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Greensboro-based RF Micro Devices Inc. hopes to build North Carolina's only home-grown semiconductor plant, which would be used to make microchips and ultimately boost North Carolina's high-technology industry.
Record #:
24300
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Abstract:
The Hmong people are a minority ethnic group in Lao and many left the country after the Vietnam War for fear of retaliation. This article examines Hmong families living in North Carolina and the types of jobs they seek.
Record #:
24324
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The author presents what economists believe will happen in the next fifteen years in North Carolina.
Record #:
2473
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In 1995, commercial and industrial construction are among the state's twenty largest projects. They include Raleigh's Crabtree Valley Mall expansion ($100 million) and Wilmington's Corning Plant expansion ($150 million).
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 15 Issue 9, Sept 1995, p46-49,51,53,55-56,58, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3618
Abstract:
The state's fifty best places for business are ranked using the criteria of workforce, infrastructure, business climate, and quality of life. Charlotte and Wilmington ranked first and second. Greenville ranked twenty-fourth.
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