NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


132 results for Journal of the North Carolina Academy of Science
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 9
Next
Record #:
5824
Author(s):
Abstract:
Troyer discusses the life and botanical contributions of Hardy Croom, who was born in Lenoir County and conducted his botanical work in the Southeastern United States. Croom, his wife, and three children perished in the wreck of the steamboat HOME, which was caught in a hurricane October 7, 1837, and wrecked near Ocracoke.
Record #:
5823
Author(s):
Abstract:
Burk discusses the life and accomplishments of Alma Leonora Holland Beers, who was the first woman botanist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the first half of the 20th-century.
Record #:
5825
Author(s):
Abstract:
Basking sharks are the second largest sharks in the world, reaching lengths of 9 meters to 13 meters. Over 363 of these creatures have been observed in North Carolina waters between 1901 and 2002.
Subject(s):
Record #:
7553
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Nags Head Woods Ecological Preserve, located in Dare County, is one of the best remaining examples of mid-Atlantic maritime deciduous forests. Using recent collections, Krings makes additions to previous botanical collections. Fifteen species of plants had not been reported previously in the preserve, while the Outer Banks has six new additions. Five have been rediscovered after having been last seen over twenty-six years ago.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
7554
Author(s):
Abstract:
Four species of frogfishes occur in North Carolina waters: the ocellated frogfish, singlespot frogfish, striated frogfish, and the sargassumfish. Other than their general ranges, little is known about them. Schwartz discusses the distribution and size of these creatures found in North Carolina and why their occurrences, except the sargassumfish, have been scarce since the 1980s.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8195
Abstract:
The authors discuss a red alga that has recently invaded the coastal waters of North Carolina. It has become abundant in the sounds and estuaries of the southeastern section of the state and is a nuisance for commercial fishing operations and industries drawing water from the lower Cape Fear River. Seasonal growth of the plant was studied at times of coldest and warmest air and water temperatures.
Full Text:
Record #:
8430
Author(s):
Abstract:
George Vanderbilt had a curiosity about nature, and he financially supported extensive botanical activities at his Biltmore estate near Asheville. Five individuals were involved in the botanical work: Chauncy Delos Beadle, Frank Ellis Boynton, Francis Marian Crayton, Charles Lawrence Boynton, and Thomas Grant Harbison. The estate had widespread plant collections, a large herbarium, and a journal, Biltmore Botanical Studies. The botanical work was discontinued after a few years, but it made a significant contribution to the knowledge of the flora of the southeastern United States.
Full Text:
Record #:
8429
Author(s):
Abstract:
Butterfly fishes are marine fishes that are usually found in tropical seas and in coral reefs. Few North Carolinians know that this fish species is part of the western Atlantic North Carolina fish fauna. Yet, five of the seven western Atlantic butterfly fishes are found in North Carolina waters. Schwartz reports the names, lengths, and distributions of the butterfly fishes in the University of North Carolina fish collection.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8435
Author(s):
Abstract:
Drainage features, such as natural streams and man-made ditches, provide pathways for nutrients and other materials from land to surface waters. The authors compared agricultural areas with other land cover types as sources of sediment-associated phosphorus in drainage features. Sample sites were chosen to include roadside ditches along agricultural fields, near livestock operations, residential areas, forested and other undeveloped areas. Several natural streams were also selected. Results indicate that agricultural activities can contribute significantly to sediment phosphorus loads in drainage features.
Full Text:
Record #:
8436
Author(s):
Abstract:
Five of seven species of belonid, ten of fourteen species of exocoetids, one scomberesocid, and five of nine species of hemiramphids fishes are known to occur in the western North Atlantic, in or off North Carolina waters. This information is drawn from specimens deposited in the North Carolina State Museum in Raleigh that give the size, distribution, abundance, and length-weight observation for each specimen. Most species frequent marine or brackish waters.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8434
Abstract:
Although sizeable literature exists on Southern Appalachian mammals, some western North Carolina counties, such as Graham, have gaps in the distributional records for a number of small mammal species. The remote nature of the region contributes to these gaps. The authors discuss small mammal surveys conducted in this county in the Nantahala National Forest in September 2003 and in September 2005.
Full Text:
Record #:
8437
Abstract:
Eight vascular plants new to Alleghany County are described. The information was collected from the eastern half of the county on an incidental basis from 2003-2006. One of the plants, Gray Poplar, was reported in the state for the first time. Three others were reported for only the second time.
Full Text:
Record #:
8727
Abstract:
Three non-native crayfishes have established breeding populations in North Carolina waters. Invasive species are ones that have been introduced into an area far from their natural ranges. Such species are considered biological pollutants, for they can have a negative effect on the local ecosystem. Future assessments of these crayfishes will require baseline data provided by this study: precise localities, dates of collection, sexes and numbers, and some information on reproduction.
Full Text:
Record #:
8728
Author(s):
Abstract:
Snapper fishes occur worldwide in tropical and temperate shallow to 550 m deep waters. In North Carolina waters sixteen snapper species have been recorded. Schwartz reports on their distributions, abundances, standard and total lengths and discusses a few length-weight relationships. Gray snappers are the most common and abundant snapper in North Carolina.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8929
Abstract:
Dare County's herpetofauna is rich because of its geographic location, mild climate, and diversity of habitats. There are seventy-nine species in the area--eighteen frogs, eight salamanders, seventeen turtles, including five sea turtles, seven lizards, twenty-seven snakes, and one crocodilian. Observations of herpetofauna were first made there in 1588 by Thomas Harriot and have continued to the present. The natural history of each species is summarized, and the region's geological history is reviewed.
Subject(s):
Full Text: