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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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13 results for Amphibians
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Record #:
1398
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brown provides a list of thirty amphibians and forty-five reptiles observed in North Carolina's western Piedmont region, with notes on size, numbers, and habitat.
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Record #:
8929
Abstract:
Dare County's herpetofauna is rich because of its geographic location, mild climate, and diversity of habitats. There are seventy-nine species in the area--eighteen frogs, eight salamanders, seventeen turtles, including five sea turtles, seven lizards, twenty-seven snakes, and one crocodilian. Observations of herpetofauna were first made there in 1588 by Thomas Harriot and have continued to the present. The natural history of each species is summarized, and the region's geological history is reviewed.
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Record #:
22360
Abstract:
Smuggling reptiles and amphibians out of North Carolina is a multi-million dollar industry. There include snakes, turtles, and frogs that are sought for their skins, to use as food, and for the occult. Cantrell relates how North Carolina Wildlife Enforcement officers are increasing their efforts to prevent this illegal trade.
Subject(s):
Record #:
25289
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carolyn Smith gives the details on the chorus tree frog including its mating rituals, its growth, and a general description of the amphibian.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Spring 2005, p6, il
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Record #:
2168
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's species of salamanders, frogs, and toads are facing an uncertain future as wetland habitats, which serve as breeding grounds are developed or drained. Approximately fifty percent of the state's permanent wetlands have been destroyed.
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Record #:
13341
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's amphibian diversity rivals that of any place on Earth, with more than ninety species living across the state.
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Record #:
17755
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For people looking to make their property more inviting to reptiles and amphibians, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission offers tips for creating suitable habitats for frogs, toads, lizards, and snakes.
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Record #:
28385
Abstract:
This study determined the economic value of reptiles and amphibians inhabiting the Charlotte-metropolitan area of North Carolina. Results provide a mechanism for placing a quantitative economic value on an important natural resource that can be used to mitigate for anthropogenic impacts.
Subject(s):
Record #:
22595
Author(s):
Abstract:
Alvin Braswell has retired after over forty years as curator of herpetology of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. Beginning his career in 1968, Braswell has mentored students and published comprehensive volumes on the reptiles and amphibians of North Carolina.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Winter 2015, p2-3, por
Record #:
28204
Abstract:
Spatial and temporal variation in anuran calling activity of four frog species was monitored at two ponds in the western Piedmont of North Carolina. Information on anuran calling patterns can be used to evaluate amphibian populations and improve monitoring programs.
Record #:
28587
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reptiles and amphibians don’t wander aimlessly. They know where they are, what they are doing, and everything else about their home range. Home ranges for reptiles and amphibians, their homes, territories, and behaviors are detailed.
Record #:
36156
Author(s):
Abstract:
This collection of the top ten photos included categories such as ages of the photographers, plants, landscapes, outdoor recreation, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, invertebrates, and animal behavior. Nearly all of the winners came from towns in North Carolina’s three regions.
Record #:
36163
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the briny deep of the Outer Banks and waterways such as streams was a diversity of tropic and cool water life. This diversity’s attribution was in part to the Labrador Current and Gulf Stream. Displaying the diversity were the ocean’s sand tiger sharks and nettle jellyfish, the river’s largemouth bass and waterdog.