NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


23 results for Snakes
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
3086
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although snakes want to avoid us as much as we want to avoid them, the mere sight of one brings fear to people. Thirty-eight species live in the state, but only six are poisonous.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
6596
Author(s):
Abstract:
Amundson describes the characteristics, breeding and food habits, and economic value of North Carolina's non-poisonous snakes. These include the common king snake, pine snake, garter snake, green snake, hog-nosed snake, blacksnake, and water snakes.
Subject(s):
Record #:
6642
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tomlin discusses Wilmington's Cape Fear Serpentarium and its creator Dean Ripa. Ripa is recognized world-wide as an authority on snakes, especially the bushmaster. The Serpentarium opened in 2002. The building has two floors with 6,000 square feet containing elaborate exhibits featuring waterfalls giant rainforest trees, lush jungles, and 200 different snakes representing species from all over the world.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p72-74, 76, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
14078
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author outlines both Native American and contemporary lore about snakes, including religious and medicinal qualities. Cherokee religion believed rattlesnakes to be men in a different form. Dr. John Brickell's writing included snake folklore in Natural History of North Carolina. There is also a discussion about North Carolina snake lore, with folktales and medicinal/therapeutic qualities of native snake species.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 2, June 1948, p9, 22
Full Text:
Record #:
24842
Author(s):
Abstract:
George the Python was a female python at Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh, NC from 1964 to 1989. George arrived at the museum from Vietnam in a suitcase belonging to Dewey Simpson and lived in the museum until she died at the age of 28.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Winter 2016, p6-7, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
26573
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many people are afraid of snakes for biological and cultural reasons. By understanding why we fear snakes, we can more easily accept their presence and appreciate their role in the natural world.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 3, June 1989, p12, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
6813
Abstract:
The brown snake is one of the most abundant species in North Carolina. Its secretiveness, coloration, and small size make it difficult to observe. This snake inhabits both rural and urban areas and is harmless to man.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8135
Abstract:
The brown water snake is harmless, but its bad temper, heavy body, and large flattened head make it appear dangerous. It is the largest of all the water snakes and has a maximum length of five feet. North Carolina's largest specimen measured fifty-seven inches in length. The brown water snake is very abundant along lakes and sluggish waterways of the Coastal Plain. It has a tendency to climb trees and bushes, often to a height of fifteen feet or more. The snake's food consists mostly of fishes.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
1776
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sightings of the eastern coral snake in North Carolina have become increasingly rare since 1960. The reasons for the snake's decline are unclear, but indications are that it might disappear altogether from the state.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
4708
Author(s):
Abstract:
Four venomous snakes - diamondback, timber, and Carolina Pygmy rattlesnakes, and the coral snake - were added to the list of endangered species in 2000. The state has over 200 species on the list. Habitat loss, pollution, and building sprawl contribute to the creatures' decline.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
6245
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beane describes the three species of kingsnakes found in North Carolina - the Eastern, scarlet, and mole.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
10152
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beane discusses the pygmy rattlesnake, sistrurus, which is North Carolina's smallest venomous snake.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
20292
Author(s):
Abstract:
Just because a snake is tiny doesn't mean it's a baby snake. North Carolina, for example, has at least nine species that can reach maturity at less than a foot in length. They are the worm snake, brown snake, red-belly snake, rough earth snake, smooth earth snake, southeastern crowned snake, ringneck snake, pine woods snake, and black swamp snake.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
35272
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three stories that feature snakes as the subject matter; “Tenderhearted Little Girl,” “Down in the Basement,” and “The Snake Hunter.”
Subject(s):
Record #:
35338
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author suggested that rattlesnakes developed this feature as a warning mechanic for its prey. As for why rattlesnakes in particular developed this feature, the author posited that the rapidity of the tail’s movement could have facilitated the growth of extra skin, which formed the rattle.
Source:
Subject(s):