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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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27 results for Insects
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Record #:
20667
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New pests and diseases are coming to the Carolinas. One is the brown marmorated stink bug, a native to Asia, which was introduced in the country in 1998. Two types of scale--the oak lecanium and the gloomy scale--attack oaks and red maples respectively. In June, 2013, the emerald ash borer was found in three state counties--Granville, Person, and Vance. This Asian beetle was first found in southeastern Michigan in 2002 and has since spread to eighteen states. Boxwood blight, found in the state in 2012, attacks American and English boxwoods.
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Record #:
24841
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Dr. Adrian Smith presents her knowledge about ants, specifically Western long-legged harvester ants. She describes some general facts about ants as well as facts more specific to her line of study. She presents the findings of research she has done involving orphan ants and what is called the ‘queen’s death mark.’
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Winter 2016, p4-5, il
Record #:
25023
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Abstract:
Mosquitoes, greenhead flies, and no-see-ums are a common itch factor in Eastern North Carolina. While every year, new methods are developed to reduce the population of these pests, using a repellent is still the best option for people exploring the outdoors.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 15 Issue 5, May 1988, p1-2, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25025
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Abstract:
A summer vacation is always accompanied by bugs. Whether these bugs are fire ants or ticks, there are ways to prevent them from biting you as well as ways to treat a bite from such bugs.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 15 Issue 5, May 1988, p4-5, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25684
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Abstract:
Dr. Julie Urban studies desert hoppers, species of plant hoppers that inhabit North American deserts. Since 2010, she has been collecting plant hoppers from around the world and sequencing their DNA in order to reconstruct their evolutionary relationships. Urban hopes to discover the features that allow desert hoppers to inhabit desert environments.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Spring 2016, p4-5, il
Record #:
26005
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Abstract:
Kyle Hedlund is an associate professor of computer science with an interest in insect biology. To merge his two passions, Hedlund created an online catalog of North American ants.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 20 Issue 2, Winter 2004, p7-9, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26931
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Abstract:
The most satisfactory way to deal with mosquitos, gnats, biting flies, ticks, and mites during the North Carolina summer is to make yourself as unattractive as possible. DEET is the best insect repellent and proper clothing protects bare skin from insect bites. To treat bites, use Campho-Phenique as an itch-reliever and an antiseptic.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p3, il
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Record #:
9971
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Ellis describes how insects use camouflage, imitation, and deception to fool predators.
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Record #:
9976
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Ellis describes a number of insects whose buzzing choruses are heard in the late summer and explains how they make them.
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Record #:
27666
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Biology professor, Quent Lupton, describes the Red Velvet Wasp. This type of wasp is known for its large, painful stingers and about 20 species can be found in North Carolina.
Record #:
28208
Abstract:
Researchers at East Carolina University conducted a study of tiger beetle (Megacephela carolina carolina) behavioral responses to simulations of bat echo location calls. Results reveal a host of acoustic startle response behaviors, suggesting that tiger beetles may have evolved hearing organs as a direct result of the hunting pressures exerted by insectivorous bats.
Record #:
28260
Abstract:
The wood-feeding cockroach Cryptocercus harbors wood-digesting protists related to those in the guts of termites. The protest symbionts of a population of Cryptocercus from northeast Georgia were examined to determine if species-specific bacteria are associated with the protists.
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Record #:
23341
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Abstract:
Numerous threats, such as disease, pests, or fire, have been constant in the daily lives of Pitt County ancestors. There are reports of numerous sicknesses and epidemics over the years. The disease that probably caused the greatest fear was Small Pox. Homeopathic cures and tonics, along with family remedies, have existed for all sorts of ailments, many of which are contained in the East Carolina Manuscript Collection of East Carolina University.
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Record #:
28342
Abstract:
The diversity and seasonal abundance of arthropods (insects and spiders) associated with two old growth and two secondary growth stands of eastern hemlock were assessed in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. More arthropods were captured in secondary growth hemlock stands than in old growth stands.
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Record #:
28337
Abstract:
The northern bush katydid (Scudderia septentrionalis) is currently listed by the North Carolina Heritage Program as a significantly rare insect. Surveys for the katydid in western North Carolina were conducted by listening for their unique mating calls. Observations provided estimates of their location and population.
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