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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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162 results for North Carolina Naturalist
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Record #:
3525
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The Coastal North Carolina exhibit at the N.C. State Museum of Natural Sciences seeks to give visitors the feel of being at the beach. At scent stations, various coastal aromas can be sampled, and a 1,200-gallon aquarium brings aquatic life up close.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 5 Issue 2, Fall/Winter 1997, p10-11, il
Record #:
3527
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The expanded N.C. State Museum of Natural Sciences, opening in 1999, will showcase ten major exhibits on the state. The Mountains to the Sea exhibit will span two floors and five habitats, featuring live animals and a 20-foot waterfall.
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Record #:
3526
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Dr. Wayne Starnes is the N.C. State Museum of Natural Sciences' first full-time curator of fishes in the 118-year history of the institution. With over 700,000 marine and freshwater specimens, it is the nation's fifth-largest regional collection.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1997, p2-9, il, por
Record #:
3524
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The bog turtle, the smallest and rarest turtle in the country, has been nominated for Endangered Species Act protection. There are more bog turtles and sites in the state than in all other Southern states combined.
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Record #:
3662
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Project Chimney Swift is a cooperative effort between three Wake County schools - Ligon, Martin, and Davis Drive - and the N.C. State Museum of Natural Sciences to study the birds' use of school chimneys. Observations will be shared on a World Wide Web site.
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Record #:
3768
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Staff members of the North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences not only collect birds but they also conduct field studies. For example, the museum undertook a study with N.C. State University, Westvaco Corp., and International Paper to see how wildlife is affected by timber management.
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Record #:
3767
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The North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences' bird collection was started by H. H. Brimley over one hundred years ago. Today, it contains over 13,000 prepared specimens, representing 1,200 species worldwide and about 420 state species.
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Record #:
3765
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The new North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, which opens in 1999, will contain a three-story glass Living Conservatory. The exhibit will recreate a dry tropical forest complete with plants, animals, and sounds.
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Record #:
4155
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Once abundant in the state's waterways, freshwater mussel populations have been reduced by dams, which lower levels of shallow streams where they reside and by silt, which is created in waterways by construction and agriculture and can choke them. Freshwater mussels have a long history in the state, having been enjoyed by Native Americans along the Yadkin River over a thousand years ago.
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Record #:
4156
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Millipedes have lived in what is now North Carolina for millions of years. Ancient mountain ranges gave rise to a large number of species. Today over 100 species of the colorful creature still reside in the Appalachians. While bright colors make them attractive to predators, millipedes produce foul- tasting chemicals that make them unpalatable to their enemies.
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Record #:
4154
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One of the state's largest freshwater invertebrates is the crayfish. Thirty-five to forty crayfish species are native to the state, and five of the species are found only in North Carolina. Two of the five live only in the Tar and Neuse river basins. Crayfish are enjoyed by over 125 vertebrates, including raccoons, otters, and bass.
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Record #:
4537
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Floor plans and photographs describe the features visitors will see on each of the four floors in the new North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, which opened April 1, 2000, in Raleigh.
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Record #:
5898
Abstract:
David S. Lee, curator of birds for the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, retired in the summer of 2003. Lee joined the museum in 1975. A major project of his has been a 25-year study of North Carolina seabirds. Among his many awards for his work in bird conservation is the 2000 Investigation award from International Partners in Flight.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Summer 2003, p15, il
Record #:
9733
Abstract:
The largest privately held collection of freshwater mollusks in the nation has been donated to the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh. Collected by Herbert D. Athearn, the extensive collection of more than 23,000 lots of mollusks was previously housed in the Museum of Fluviatile Mollusks in Cleveland, Tennessee.
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Record #:
9734
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Abstract:
Burgess discusses the controversy between the U.S. Navy and local residents and environmentalists over the Navy's decision to build an outlying landing field (OLF) on 30,000 acres in Beaufort and Washington counties near the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge. The field would be used by jet pilots to practice landings. The refuge is known for its thousands of wintering birds.
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