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35 results for North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
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Record #:
3526
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Dr. Wayne Starnes is the N.C. State Museum of Natural Sciences' first full-time curator of fishes in the 118-year history of the institution. With over 700,000 marine and freshwater specimens, it is the nation's fifth-largest regional collection.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1997, p2-9, il, por
Record #:
3768
Author(s):
Abstract:
Staff members of the North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences not only collect birds but they also conduct field studies. For example, the museum undertook a study with N.C. State University, Westvaco Corp., and International Paper to see how wildlife is affected by timber management.
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Record #:
3767
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The North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences' bird collection was started by H. H. Brimley over one hundred years ago. Today, it contains over 13,000 prepared specimens, representing 1,200 species worldwide and about 420 state species.
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Record #:
3765
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The new North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, which opens in 1999, will contain a three-story glass Living Conservatory. The exhibit will recreate a dry tropical forest complete with plants, animals, and sounds.
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Record #:
3927
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Wilmington is donating the fossil remains of a prehistoric giant sloth, found there in 1991, to the N.C. State Museum of Natural Sciences. It is the most complete sloth skeleton ever found in the state. The creature weighed three tons and was eighteen feet long.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 48 Issue 9, Sept 1998, p16, il
Record #:
4316
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scheduled to open April 7, 2000, the new North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh will be the largest natural science museum in the Southeast. The seven- story, 200,000-square-foot structure quadruples the old museum's exhibit space. The museum's focus will be serving as an indoor field guide to the natural diversity of the state. A featured attraction is the 112-million-year-old skeleton of a predatory Arcocanthosaurus, which is displayed nowhere else in the world.
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Record #:
4537
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Floor plans and photographs describe the features visitors will see on each of the four floors in the new North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, which opened April 1, 2000, in Raleigh.
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Record #:
4552
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For those who enjoy taking a step back through time, the new North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh is a treasure trove of fossils collected along the North Carolina coast, coastal plain, and Piedmont. Included in the collection are a rare 500-million-year-old Pteridinum carolinaense, one of only seven found worldwide and the only one on exhibit; a 110-million-year-old dinosaur; and a rare right whale.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2000, p26-27, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4571
Author(s):
Abstract:
The new North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, scheduled to open April 7, 2000, in Raleigh, will be the largest of its kind in the Southeast. The museum is planning a 24-hour grand opening, which will be the first round-the-clock opening ever held in the state.
Record #:
5113
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh contains thousands of specimens and skeletons of fish, amphibians, and invertebrates. Items date from 1890 to 1999. Green discusses the various collections and how scientists use them to reveal habitat information.
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Record #:
16618
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Installation of an outdoor globe being called Daily Plant just finished at the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences. Visitors will see the Southern Hemisphere displayed prominently and with a high degree of accuracy. The State Employee's Credit Union Foundation funded the project which is part of the new Nature Research Center at the Museum of Natural Sciences.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 15, Apr 2012, p8-9, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
17721
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The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences holds a myriad of coastal treasures from fossils to sea stars.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2012, p25-28, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
19237
Abstract:
The article reviews plans for a new facility for the Museum of History to be built between the Capitol and Legislative Building. Paired with this new museum building is a second project to construct a new Museum of Natural Science nearby. Both projects aim to create new museum spaces for these important collections, modernize Raleigh's urban design, and promote tourism.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 36 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1988, p4-7, il
Record #:
20850
Author(s):
Abstract:
The old museum is right next door to the new North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. Estimates are that it will take at least five months to move the heavy boxes of books, delicate containers of plates, and over 3,000 live animals, not to mention the offices of nearly one hundred staff people. Walters explains what it will take to move the Southeast's largest natural history museum.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Fall/Win 1999, p10-11, il
Record #:
20950
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pishney traces the development of the North Carolina Museum of Natural History from 1887 to the present. Two English immigrants, H.H. and C.S. Brimley, guided the museum's growth through its first half century and laid the path the museum would follow in the succeeding years.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Spr 2004, p2-7, il, por