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111 results for Carolina Gardener
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Record #:
17365
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Fair recommends tress to plant for the mountains, Piedmont, midlands, and coast. The list is not exhaustive and the author chooses trees that she knows are successful in these areas--drought tolerant, excellent bloom or fall color, and do well in most soils.
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Record #:
17370
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Edwin Gonzalez has a garden different from most gardeners. His is located on the rooftop of the 14-story Battery Park apartment building which was built in 1924 in downtown Asheville. Gonzalez grew up in Puerto Rico and was involved in gardening on the family farm. He received over $300 in plant aid from Project EMMA--Eat better, Move More, Age well--an organization that seeks to increase wellness and health opportunities for participants in the Council on Aging of Buncombe County.
Source:
Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 24 Issue 7, Sept 2012, p50-54, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
17366
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The loblolly pine accounts for 50% of timber production in the Southeast. It is marketed as yellow and is prized for both lumber and pulpwood. Wood reports on a 1960s' program of the North Carolina State University Department of Forestry--the Tree Improvement Program--which sought to produce new and improved pine trees for the timber industry. One of the results was a smaller, slower growing loblolly pine for commercial use.
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Record #:
17369
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Whether it is a stone path lying on grass in a seven-circuit pattern or the more elaborate Chartres design, a labyrinth garden is a pattern with purpose. It has only one path--the way in is also the way out. Yoest discusses their uses and includes pictures of the Labyrinth and Healing Garden in Crossnore, The Labyrinth at Millbrook Baptist Church in Raleigh, and Christopher Mello's Asheville garden. The article includes instructions on constructing a labyrinth.
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Record #:
17368
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Chase describes the evolution of Curve Studios and Garden which is located close to the French Broad River in Asheville's River Arts District. The garden is bordered with elegant flowerbeds and enhanced with quiet seating areas and lots of sculpture. Patty Torno owns the Curve Studios complex and tends the garden in all the seasons.
Source:
Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 24 Issue 7, Sept 2012, p30-35, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
17367
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Davenport describes how adding low-maintenance plants, like blackberries, blue berries, and muscadines, to a garden adds beauty and good taste.
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Record #:
17376
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This plant was first identified in 1784 by Swedish naturalist Peter Thunberg and later named for Dutch physician and botanist Martin Houttuyu. It is a plant of many names. Loewer describes its characteristics and what to watch out for if used as ground cover.
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Record #:
17375
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Although carpenter bees are known for the damage they make by drilling in fences, houses, and other wood, Pollock states they also benefit gardens and lists some ways gardener's may attract them to their gardens.
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Record #:
17377
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Yoest describes how the addition of a gate to a garden can enhance its appearance. She includes design strategies and hardware and accessories.
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Record #:
17398
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Winter can be a gloomy time with chill winds blowing on some days and gray clouds on others. Anderson suggests brightening up the garden at this season with some trees and shrubs with bright gold variegation. She lists a number of evergreens that last through all seasons into the dark winter days, such as variegated Japanese aucuba, abelia kaleidoscope, yucca gold guard, pyracantha, nandina (the one with yellow berries), golden threadleaf false cypress.
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Record #:
17399
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Seed catalogs do more than sell seeds. In this country they date back to the early 1800s, and the Smithsonian has a collection of some 10,000. In the pages are found information about plant history, planting and harvest times, growing habits, pest control, and other items. Chase includes a brief description and the URL for some of her favorite catalogs--Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds, Territorial Seed Company, and John Scheepers Kitchen Garden Seeds.
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Record #:
17397
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Abstract:
Fair describes the four-step Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program as a way to remove gardening pests. The plan \"uses information on the life cycles of pests and their interaction with the environment. Using this with available methods of control, gardeners can assess damage economically with the lowest possible damage to humans, animals, property and the environment.\"
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Record #:
17395
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Murphy describes a year-round activity of container gardening, including equipment and plants. Some of the plants recommended are vinca, sweet potato vine, crested celosia, and caladiums.
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Record #:
17396
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Abstract:
Loewer discusses the history of tarragon, a plant that the Greeks described as far back as 500 B.C., and the number of ways it has been used through the ages up to the present.
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Record #:
17410
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Abstract:
Loewer describes the characteristics of the China fir and its history. The first was first collected in 1701 by Dr. James Cunningham, an English surgeon and avid plant collector, but it would be another hundred years before it was brought to England. It is an unusual and rare conifer in the North Carolina mountains, but will survive and flourish.
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