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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Spiders
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Record #:
2672
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Abstract:
The spruce-fir moss spider, which measures one-eighth of an inch and lives only in the Southern Appalachians, is in danger of extinction. In February, 1995, it was listed as an endangered species.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 44 Issue 1, Fall 1995, p16, il
Record #:
25838
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Jason Bond, professor of biology at East Carolina, has just received three National Science Foundation grants to study spiders and millipedes. The research will focus on cataloging species from around the world, examining biodiversity and evolutionary biology with the aid of undergraduate and graduate students.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2006, p27 Periodical Website
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Record #:
26411
Author(s):
Abstract:
The spruce-fir moss spider, which measures one-eighth of an inch and lives only in the Southern Appalachians, is in danger of extinction. In February, 1995, it was listed as an endangered species.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 44 Issue 1, Winter 1996, p16, il
Record #:
9019
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this seventh of a series about wildlife species that have “Carolina” in their common or scientific name, Godfrey describes the Carolina wolf spider. This large spider is unusual for two reasons: it does not spin a web to capture prey, preferring to run it down, and it is among the very few non-vertebrates which show any interest in their young other than as menu items.
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Record #:
4709
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The spider is one of mankind's most beneficial creatures, but its appearance is often frightening to those it helps. Around 3,000 species of spiders live in North America, and 1,500 of them make their home in North Carolina. Ellis describes a number of the spiders and their web building and hunting techniques.
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Record #:
10305
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Marsh observes and describes an intriguing inhabitant in his back yard--a golden orb spider.
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Record #:
28342
Abstract:
The diversity and seasonal abundance of arthropods (insects and spiders) associated with two old growth and two secondary growth stands of eastern hemlock were assessed in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. More arthropods were captured in secondary growth hemlock stands than in old growth stands.
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Record #:
36197
Author(s):
Abstract:
To help draw the line between harmful or harmless insects is a description of ten, many which can be found in gardens. Harmless are pillbugs, common whitetail skimmer, bald faced hornet, and spiny back orb weaver. Destructive are harlequin bug, saddleback caterpillar, three lined potato beetle, wooly bear caterpillar, black carpenter and kudzu bug.
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