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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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70 results for Endangered species
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Record #:
132
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once classified as endangered, the brown pelican is staging a comeback.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan 1992, p10-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
1224
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is playing a crucial role in a new international program, Partners in Flight, which is trying to save dwindling bird species.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 40 Issue 3, Sept/Oct 1993, p4-6, 15, il
Record #:
1400
Author(s):
Abstract:
By the 1970s, the red wolf faced extinction. Six years after a groundbreaking experiment to save the red wolf began in the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, the shy, nocturnal wolf has a chance of survival.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1993, p8-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2672
Author(s):
Abstract:
The spruce-fir moss spider, which measures one-eighth of an inch and lives only in the Southern Appalachians, is in danger of extinction. In February, 1995, it was listed as an endangered species.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 44 Issue 1, Fall 1995, p16, il
Record #:
3467
Author(s):
Abstract:
Forty species of bats inhabit the nation. Of these, fifteen species, including the rare eastern big-eared bat, make their homes in the state, and approximately one-third of them are endangered or at risk.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue 3, Summer 1997, p16, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
3608
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located near Pittsboro, in Chatham County, the Carnivore Preservation Trust houses over 250 endangered species, including tigers and binturong. The trust seeks to preserve endangered animals, especially those living in rainforests.
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Record #:
4239
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Abstract:
Knowing where to go and look gives nature lovers the opportunity to view endangered species in the wild. Weymouth Woods in the Sandhills is a good place to see red-cockaded woodpeckers. Viewing eagles in the Piedmont is best in the upper reaches of Jordan Lake in Chatham County. Red wolves and loggerhead sea turtles are more elusive, but the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge is best for wolves, while Hammock's Beach State Park is good for loggerheads.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 46 Issue 3, Summer 1999, p2-6, il
Record #:
4614
Abstract:
The red-cockaded woodpecker has been on the endangered species list since 1970. In 1999, the North Carolina Department of Transportation purchased 9,732 acres in northeastern Tyrrell County for $16.5 million to establish a preserve. Currently 18 woodpecker colonies live there. The land is heavily forested and fronts the Albemarle Sound and Little Alligator River. Over the next 7 years the department will set aside $175 million for wetlands preservation, stream restoration, and wildlife protection.
Record #:
4926
Author(s):
Abstract:
Project Bog Turtle is a conservation initiative started in 1995 by the North Carolina Herpetological Society and is the latest in a number of researches done on bog turtles dating back to the late 19th-century. Among the project's objectives are habitat protection, habitat restoration and management, involvement of landowners, and site surveys.
Record #:
5210
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once classified as endangered, the brown pelican is staging a comeback. At one time the only known nesting flock in the 1970s was on Ocracoke. Kowite discusses reasons why the pelican became endangered and how it survived to thrive in North Carolina.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2002, p26-29, il Periodical Website
Record #:
8245
Abstract:
Mike and Ali Lubbock founded the Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Center in Scotland Neck in Halifax County in 1989. Covering about nine acres, the center boasts the largest collection of waterfowl in the world and is a conservation and research orientated center for birds, especially rare and endangered waterfowl. Sylvan Heights contains around 3,000 birds and 170 species, including 30 species that cannot be seen in any other collection or zoo in North America.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p32-34, 35-36, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9074
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Part 4 of endangered wildlife, reptiles are categorized. The status of these species is based on federal definitions for endangered, rare, undetermined, and peripheral species. Information includes the species; its range in North Carolina; preferred habitat; general comments about it; and status.
Record #:
9422
Abstract:
The authors describe the brown pelican and why the bird is becoming an endangered species in the face of new environmental hazards brought on by modern man.
Record #:
9927
Author(s):
Abstract:
There never were many bog turtles in North Carolina, and real estate development, habitat destruction, and the illegal pet trade have seriously reduced the bog turtle population that has survived.
Record #:
15931
Author(s):
Abstract:
Increasingly in the United States, the preservation of endangered species and biological diversity conflicts with the mounting pressures of urban growth and development. This article presents several arguments on the importance of species protection.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Fall 1989, p32-41, bibl, f
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