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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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62 results for Venters, Vic
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Record #:
7846
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The shortnose sturgeon is the only federally-listed endangered marine fish in the state's waters. An intensive study is being conducted by the North Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit in the Cape Fear River system to determine the abundance and distribution patterns of this fish. The shortnose sturgeon was considered extinct in North Carolina waters until one was caught in the Brunswick River in 1987.
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Record #:
7916
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Flathead catfish, which were introduced from the Mississippi River into the Cape Fear River, can weigh close to sixty pounds. The fish is not popular with local fishermen as it is decimating other fish populations, like the sunfish. A recently passed local law now allows fishermen to electrofish for the catfish in parts of the Cape Fear River and in Sampson, Bladen, and Pender Counties. Only catfish are susceptible to this technique; bass and sunfish are not affected.
Record #:
7917
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Private groups are taking an increasingly active role in helping wildlife and its critical habits. Venters describes five diverse groups that are working to save the state's wildlife and environment: the North Carolina Wildlife Federation, Ducks unlimited, Trout Unlimited, the National Wild Turkey Federation, and Quail Unlimited.
Record #:
7920
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Water pollution, habitat alteration, and overfishing have contributed to the decline of one of the country's best striped bass fisheries in the Albemarle Sound and Roanoke River. A project now underway in Aurora may help to reverse that trend. Using N.C. Sea Grant Program and National Coastal Research Institute research, Lee and Harvey Brothers of Aurora became the first persons in the nation to pond-raise hybrid sea bass commercially when they harvested their first crop of 70,000 pounds. The fish is a cross between a striped bass and a white fish. Venters discusses what this success means to the aquaculture industry and to the recovery of the fish in the wild.
Record #:
9939
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Mention coyote and images of the West appear in the mind; however, within the past decade this pest from the West has arrived in North Carolina. There have been sightings in Jones, Craven, and Beaufort Counties, but the first evidence that the animals are breeding was discovered when some coyote pups were found on a Jones County farm.
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Record #:
26414
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The line between outdoor recreation and conservation is complicated. Fly-fishing and bird hunting are popular outdoor activities in North Carolina, but one should remember that they have an impact on natural resources.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 42 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1994, p5, il
Record #:
26608
Author(s):
Abstract:
Groundwater in North Carolina has traditionally remained a pure source of drinking water, capable of human consumption without the treatment required of surface water. However, groundwater is being threatened by pollution, hazardous materials, and waste. The state is now in need of a comprehensive monitoring program and more stringent regulations.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 4, July/Aug 1988, p12-14, il
Record #:
26613
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The total duck population counts are at their second lowest-level in recorded history. Reasons for their decline could be attributed to over-harvesting, but also to drought and habitat destruction. Consequently, new restrictions are imposed to duck hunting in North Carolina.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1988, p4-5, il
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Record #:
26622
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Duck populations have dramatically declined in North America, partly due to waterfowl hunting. In response, North Carolina has implemented more waterfowl regulations and hunting restrictions. Hunters may need to start stressing the quality experience of hunting, rather than the number of birds killed.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1988, p5-6, il
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Record #:
716
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With brushes and paint, Alan Cheek records his affection for the Outer Banks, tidal marshes, commercial fishing and colorful artifacts of life in coastal Carolina.
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Record #:
717
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A strange and distressing disease sweeping down the Appalachians is killing native dogwoods.
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Record #:
7923
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The coastal plain is the primary wintering range for woodcocks. Most woodcocks head north in the spring, but a number live and breed in the state year-round. The woodcock's population has declined over the past twenty years because of habitat alteration and destruction, winter mortality, and predation.
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Record #:
718
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As a result of a restoration project by the US Fish and Wildlife Service at the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, red wolves, an important part of North Carolina's wildlife heritage, are reappearing.
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Record #:
7975
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Recent surveys conducted by biologists from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission show there has been a catastrophic decline statewide in native freshwater mollusks. There are about sixty species found in the state; thirty are in serious trouble. What is puzzling to biologists is that there is little evidence of direct pollution or water disturbance and that decline is also occurring in pristine waters. Airborne pollutants, like acid precipitation, are likely culprits.
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Record #:
7933
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Spotfin chubs are among the rarest fish in the Southeast and are found only in North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. Water pollution and reservoir construction have reduced its habitat. Using spotfin found only in the Little Tennessee River within the state, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and other state and federal agencies seek to reintroduce the fish to Abrams Creek in the Great Smoky Mountains. The planned five-year project is now in its second year.
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