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4 results for Osprey
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Record #:
6713
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ospreys, also known as sea hawks, are now a familiar sight along the North Carolina coast. Before the use of DDT was banned in 1972, the pesticide got into the food chain of ospreys; this caused them to lay thin-shelled eggs that affected the survival rate of the young. Since the banning, ospreys have been increasing in numbers. This fish-eating species mates for life and returns to the same nest year after year.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
26547
Author(s):
Abstract:
For 27 years, the U.S. Forest Service has been conducting annual surveys of bald eagles and ospreys in national forests of North Carolina. Data shows a remarkable increase in populations of both species.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1990, p5, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
1465
Author(s):
Abstract:
A few years ago the osprey neared extinction as eggshell thinning, caused by DDT, reduced populations. Yet once regulations banned the use of pesticides that accumulate in such organisms as fish, on which ospreys feed, populations stabilized.
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Full Text:
Record #:
29619
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ospreys are raptors, or birds of prey, that dive underwater in pursuit of fish. The males also perform an elaborate courtship display, dipping and diving in the air with loud cries while carrying a fish or nesting material to attract a mate. Coastal bird watchers in North Carolina can observe ospreys during their breeding season from early spring through late fall.