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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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68 results for Smith, Pam
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Record #:
4448
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The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Center for Coastal Fisheries and Marine Habitat Research at Beaufort, known as NOAA's Beaufort Laboratory, is marking its one hundredth year of service. It is the nation's second oldest marine research laboratory.
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Record #:
4552
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For those who enjoy taking a step back through time, the new North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh is a treasure trove of fossils collected along the North Carolina coast, coastal plain, and Piedmont. Included in the collection are a rare 500-million-year-old Pteridinum carolinaense, one of only seven found worldwide and the only one on exhibit; a 110-million-year-old dinosaur; and a rare right whale.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2000, p26-27, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4657
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The Outer Banks's maritime forests, including Currituck Banks, Buxton Woods, and Zeke's Island, provide groundwater storage and refuge for wildlife. Climate changes from north to south account for the variety in vegetation with cabbage palmetto trees on the southern end and deciduous canopy trees on the northern. Protecting the forest is a joint effort of local, state, and federal agencies.
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Record #:
4654
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Beach erosion is constant. To deal with it, the Coastal Resources Commission uses building relocation and beach renourishment (moving sand from others areas onto eroded beaches). Bulldozing is used as an emergency. Sandbagging is used as a temporary fix. Beach renourishment is controversial, and Smith summarizes the views of the public and environmentalists.
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Record #:
4655
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Smith describes the effects of Hurricane Floyd on the Brunswick County community of Oak Island, then discusses the Coastal Resources Commission's plans for redevelopment of beach structures in ocean hazard areas.
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Record #:
4731
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Through his CBS television program \"Sunday Morning,\" Charles Kuralt brought the beauty of the nation's National Wildlife Refuges to millions of viewers. To honor his efforts, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service created the Charles Kuralt Trail, which links eleven national wildlife refuges and one national fish hatchery. The trail winds though the coastal plain of Virginia and North Carolina, and includes the Great Dismal Swamp and Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge.
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Record #:
4732
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The red drum, also called channel bass, puppy drum, or redfish, was named North Carolina's saltwater fish in 1971. Currently red drum numbers are dwindling, and anglers are limited to one 18- to 27- inch red drum a day. However, any number may be caught under the state's catch-and-release program. Sea Grant recreational fishing extension specialist Jim Bahem discusses fishing for red drum using this technique.
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Record #:
4729
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Next to Washington state, North Carolina has the nation's second-largest ferry system, with twenty-four ferries operating year-round. Besides transporting two million passengers yearly, the ferry system is a lifeline for many communities. In emergencies, ferries assist in hurricane evacuation and also aid in water rescues. Soon selected ferries will become science labs, carrying automated devices to monitor such data as salinity, temperature, oxygen levels, and nutrients in coastal waters.
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Record #:
4782
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Historic Bald Head Lighthouse, built on Bald Head Island in 1817-1818, is North Carolina's oldest surviving lighthouse. It was neither the first or the last lighthouse to send a guiding beacon to mariners entering the Cape Fear River. Smith chronicles their history.
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Record #:
4841
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Since the enactment of the Clean Water Act in 1972 by Congress, North Carolina has sought to improve the quality of its water. Smith reviews the progress that has been made, beginning with the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2000, p16-20, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4850
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A good water supply is important to the growth and well-being of North Carolina. In a fifteen county area in the central coastal plain, which includes the fast-growing counties of Pitt, Lenoir, Craven and Onslow, the water supply is becoming critical. Smith describes ways a number of communities are dealing with the water supply issue and what plans the state has.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2000, p21-22, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4931
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Abstract:
The Cape Fear River rises near Greensboro and empties into the Atlantic Ocean at Wilmington. The entire river basin covers over 9,000 square miles. Along the waterway lie 107 cities and towns and a population of almost two million. Preserving the water quality requires cooperation and flexibility among many groups. Smith discusses current plans to protect the waterway.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2001, p6-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4981
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Abstract:
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service closed Lake Mattamuskeet Lodge because of structural deterioration in certain sections. Repairs will take at least two years at a cost of $2 million. In the meantime the East Carolina University Field Station for Coastal Studies, which uses the facility, is seeking alternate housing so that the program can continue to operate.
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Record #:
4980
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Abstract:
In 2000, 839 sea turtles stranded along the North Carolina coast, the highest number ever reported. Encounters with boats caused some deaths; net fragments attached to some shells suggested possible entrapment in commercial fishing nets for others. However, causes for 91 percent of the deaths could not be determined.
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Record #:
4984
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Abstract:
Maintaining a balance between expanding development and the coastal ecology is a must in protecting the fragile coastal lands. Smith discusses the activities of the North Carolina Audubon Society and the Northeast New Hanover Conservancy, two agencies working to preserve the land.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2001, p16-19, il Periodical Website