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36 results for Wetlands
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Record #:
225
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina ecologists view wetlands as the sustainers of the well-being of coastal waters, while the timber industry, companies such as Weyerhaueser, Union Camp, and Champion International, view wetlands as places for the harvesting and growing of timber.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1992, p10-14, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
719
Author(s):
Abstract:
Small, scattered and disappearing, mountain bogs are some of our rarest habitats and contain some of the least common plants and animals. Yet we know almost nothing about these tiny, isolated worlds.
Subject(s):
Record #:
8371
Author(s):
Abstract:
PSC Phosphate, Inc., has applied to the Army Corps of Engineers for a Clean Water Act Section 404 permit to impact and fill wetlands and waters of the state for the purpose of continuing their mining operations along South Creek in eastern Beaufort County. A similar grant that allowed the company to impact over 1,200 acres of wetlands in 1997 resulted in the largest permitted destruction of wetlands in the history of the state. If the new permit is granted, the Pamlico River basin would lose 2,500 acres of high-quality wetlands.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 25 Issue 4, Fall 2006, p1, 3, map
Record #:
12447
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article features communities that successfully integrated water resource management into urban sustainability efforts.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 35 Issue , Summer 2010, p31-42, map, f
Full Text:
Record #:
19211
Author(s):
Abstract:
Farmers have found that the wetlands that lie adjacent to coastal waters yield bountiful crops, but only if the water can be controlled.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 11 Issue 8, Sept 1984, p3-4, map, f Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
25066
Author(s):
Abstract:
Storm water regulations are hard to enforce. However, the city of Smithfield has found a way to do it through wetlands with great success. It has helped not only the storm water pollution, but the community as well.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2004, p16-20, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
25177
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pamlico-Tar River Foundation director Dave McNaught discusses why wetlands are such a crucial part of the environment. Wetlands are important not only for the animals living there, but the people in the surrounding areas.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Spring 1990, p4, il
Record #:
25192
Author(s):
Abstract:
The legal battle over the protection of wetlands continues and is contended all the way up to the federal level. Many factors are at play from big oil companies to environmental considerations.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Winter 1992, p4, il
Record #:
25214
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pamlico-Tar River Foundation details its aims with the Environmental Conservation Statement it made regarding Texasgulf’s request to mine in the wetlands.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 13 Issue 3, Spring 1994, p1
Record #:
25217
Author(s):
Abstract:
Various agencies voice their concerns and comments on the Texasgulf request to mine phosphate from several wetlands.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 13 Issue 4, Summer 1994, p1-2
Subject(s):
Record #:
26001
Author(s):
Abstract:
The theme of the 39th annual National Wildlife Week is “Save our Wetlands.” Members of conservation groups, teachers and students will participate in activities that focus on the priceless and irreplaceable nature of the nation’s wetlands. Programs will emphasize the inventory, variety, threats to, and ways to protect wetland resources.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Jan-Feb 1976, p17
Record #:
26014
Author(s):
Abstract:
The rapid loss of wetland habitat is considered one of the most critical natural resource problems in the United States, but steps are being taken to preserve remaining wetlands. The Wetland Loan Act and the Migratory Bird Hunting Conservation stamp are efforts to save land and raise funds for wetlands.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 20 Issue 2, Mar-Apr 1976, p26-27
Subject(s):
Record #:
26421
Author(s):
Abstract:
Due to a recent federal district court decision, it will be more difficult for developers to take over forested wetlands. The court held that some clearing activities were in violation of the Clean Water Act.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 1, Jan 1980, p6
Subject(s):
Record #:
26595
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina wetlands serve a variety of functions that are important to maintaining the integrity of our environment. However, the state faces difficult decisions concerning the relative value of wetlands to alternative land use practices.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1989, p12, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
26634
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thousands of acres of North Carolina pocosin wetlands have been developed without federal permits because the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ruled they are not wetlands. Now the Environmental Protection Agency will decide whether state coastal areas proposed for development constitute wetlands.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1987, p8, il
Subject(s):