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10 results for Green, Charlotte Hilton
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Record #:
10675
Abstract:
Bernadette Hoyle, founder of the Tar Heel Writers' Roundtable, has a wide acquaintance with North Carolina's literary figures, enabling her to recruit both outstanding speakers and attendees to her annual meetings. The yearly conference has grown significantly, last year's attendance being nearly double that of the first year's, with writers coming from eight different states.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 4, July 1969, p18, il
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Record #:
8526
Abstract:
The state is a natural haven for birds. For centuries huge flocks from the north have come down the eastern flyways to winter on the Outer Banks, sounds, and marshes. Starting in 1938, the federal government began establishing a number sanctuaries for birds and other wildlife. The first three were Pea Island, Mattamuskeet, and Swan Quarter. In the 1960s, three more were added--Pee Dee, Pungo, and Cedar Island. Green describes each refuge. Part of Mackay Island is also a refuge, and it is administered from Virginia's Back Bay Refuge.
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Record #:
8544
Abstract:
The state's saltwater marshes serve waterfowl as nesting, resting, and feeding sites. Because of the controversies between conservationists and developers over the use of salt marshes, they are better known then freshwater marshes. Freshwater marshes are created by glaciers, river deltas, beaver dams, and manmade projects and are as important as the saltwater ones. They provide homes to countless birds, mammals, invertebrates, fish, reptiles, amphibians, and many kinds of plants.
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Record #:
8543
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The North Carolina Shell Club started in 1957 when word was sent out to shell enthusiasts across the state to come to an organizational meeting at the North Carolina Museum of Natural History in Raleigh. The turnout was large. Green recounts the club's history and adventures.
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Record #:
8913
Abstract:
H. H. and C. S. Brimley, immigrant English boys, came to Raleigh in 1880. Herbert became an outstanding taxidermist and worked for the Museum of Natural Science for sixty years, fifty-one as curator and director. Clement was an entomologist for the Agriculture Department and published the first catalog of insects in the South, The List of Insects of North Carolina. The Brimleys were the state's most influential naturalists, whose work left a lasting mark on the state.
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Record #:
8921
Abstract:
In this article, Green discusses “The Chat,” which was the official bulletin of the Carolina Bird Club. The publication maintained high stands of content during its more then thirty-five-year history. It remains today a prominent spokesman for a vast group of citizen-environmentalists of the Carolinas.
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Record #:
8922
Abstract:
Green continues her history of the Carolina Bird Club, including particular meetings, member contributions, and Charles L. Broley, the Eagle Man, who, upon retirement, spent winters in Florida and began banding young eaglets in their nets.
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Record #:
8914
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In the conclusion of her article on the Brimley brothers, Green discusses further contributions the two naturalists made to the State Museum of Natural History in Raleigh.
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Record #:
8917
Abstract:
Green recounts the history of the Carolina Bird Club over the last thirty-five years. The club organized in Raleigh in March 1937.
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