NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for Writers
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
10675
Abstract:
Bernadette Hoyle, founder of the Tar Heel Writers' Roundtable, has a wide acquaintance with North Carolina's literary figures, enabling her to recruit both outstanding speakers and attendees to her annual meetings. The yearly conference has grown significantly, last year's attendance being nearly double that of the first year's, with writers coming from eight different states.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 4, July 1969, p18, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
12733
Abstract:
One of the outstanding literary characters associated with the history of Carolina is Edgar Wilson (Bill) Nye, who died in February 1896. Born in Shirley, Maine in 1850, Nye gave up law to become a writer, moving Henderson County in 1886. It was during these years that Nye wrote many famous works, including history of the United States, the Art of Lecturing, and Guest at Ludlow.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 14, Dec 1961, p23-24, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
15912
Author(s):
Abstract:
Awarding the Mayflower Cup marked an important annual honor of best publication by a state resident. Beginning in 1931, awards were announced at annual meetings of the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association and initially were awarded to either best fiction or non-fiction before creation of the Sir Walter Raleigh Award for fiction (1952).
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
24440
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jack Kerouac was a writer who spent time in Rocky Mount, North Carolina. The area inspired some of his later work.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 12, May 1993, p35-38, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24962
Author(s):
Abstract:
Author Wiley Cash talks about his novels and his experience as a writer, including reading reviews on his books and a movie being made based on one of his books.
Record #:
25812
Author(s):
Abstract:
Daniel Wallace teaches creative writing at UNC and is the author of four novels. He was previously a student at UNC but quit school to work for his father’s business. He returned to Chapel Hill to give writing a shot, and ended up writing the novel, Big Fish, which became a movie directed by Tim Burton.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Winter 2008, p40-42, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
26120
Author(s):
Abstract:
Susan Naverette, a professor of English, studied turn-of-the-century British horror stories and images. In her upcoming book, she examines the art and its authors, and the evolutionary science that influenced them. These horror stories were part of a growing fear of devolution to a primitive state.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Fall 1998, p4-6, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
26142
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nineteenth-century print limitations helped define William Blake as a writer, but modern technology is redefining him as a multimedia artist. Blake’s poems are what Joseph Viscomi, professor of English, calls translations. Blake combined his writing and art into one medium he called an illuminated book.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
34287
Author(s):
Abstract:
David Sedaris is widely considered America’s leading humorist. In an interview, Sedaris discusses growing up in Raleigh, North Carolina. His new book, Calypso, is a memoir set in Emerald Isle.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
35213
Author(s):
Abstract:
This publication, coming from Joyner’s two decades of service, is more shared appreciation for what he contributed to Carolina Country than shared math puzzles and history riddles.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
35752
Author(s):
Abstract:
The interview with this Massachusetts native revealed his beliefs about the importance of and teaching approach for poetry. Heffernan also discussed his life as a poet in North Carolina, which he asserted was the “most literary state in the country.”
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p28-29, 48
Record #:
37027
Author(s):
Abstract:
Raised in the South, Wallace connected to her own family history and made discoveries about her hometown in her fieldwork about foodways, and she has used her talents as a writer and illustrator to illuminate hidden gems in North Carolina culture for national audiences.
Record #:
36555
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Preservation Society of Asheville and Buncombe County, Parks and Recreation Department, and Historic Resources Commission, restored a historic landmark associated with a North Carolina native son. How it may contribute to the future of other writers is the plan to transform this cabin, along with another nearby structure, into a writers’ conference center.