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28 results for Wolfe, Thomas, 1900-1938
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Record #:
1509
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Bentz uses Wolfe's short stories, not edited into book form until 1987, to refute the charge that Wolfe's novels are \"autobiographical,\" little more than fictionalized personal journals.
Record #:
2926
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A rare first edition of Thomas Wolfe's LOOK HOMEWARD, ANGEL, a specially inscribed copy he gave to his mother, has been given to the North Carolina Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill by the author's nieces and nephews.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 2, July 1996, p3
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Record #:
4770
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October 3, 2000, marks the one hundredth anniversary of the birth of author Thomas Wolfe in Asheville. Among the events commemorating Wolfe's centenary are the release of a new postage stamp, publication for the first time of the uncut manuscript of Look Homeward, Angel under its original title, O Lost: A Story of the Buried Life, and various events in Asheville and at his alma mater in Chapel Hill.
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Record #:
4769
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One of the strongest influences on the young Thomas Wolfe was his teacher, Margaret Rose Roberts. Wolfe attended the North State Fitting School in Asheville from 1912 to 1916. It was there that Roberts nurtured his writing talent and opened the world of fine literature to him.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 5, Oct 2000, p54-58, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
4768
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On October 3, 2000, the literary world will mark the 100th birthday of author Thomas Wolfe of Asheville, who died in 1938. Three friends and acquaintances - Gladys Coates, Marnie Polk Ross, and Wilma Dykeman - share memories of this literary giant.
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Record #:
8955
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The Walk of Fame at Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida, recently added a stone for North Carolina's best known author, Thomas Wolfe. The walk is bordered by over 800 stones such as Wolfe's, and all are from the birthplace or other spot associated with the person they honor. Begun fifty years ago as a personal hobby by Dr. Hamilton Holt, then president of Rollins, as many as thirty stones are added to the walk each year.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 3, Aug 1979, p21-22, 33, il
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Record #:
9113
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Thomas Wolfe went to England in 1924, the first of four extended trips he made there. Most of his LOOK HOMEWARD, ANGEL was written in London and Oxford, and since the publishing of his journals in 1970, it is now possible to follow his trek through England. While in Chelsea, Wolfe often wrote 3,000 words a day of his novel. In 1927, Wolfe tired of England and went to Germany which he much preferred.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 1, June 1976, p17-18, il
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Record #:
9130
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This article is a reprint of a 1963 memo relating a four-year acquaintance between the author and Thomas Wolfe. Written at the request of author Andrew Turnbull, who was writing Wolfe's biography, passages of the memo appear in Turnbull's book. The memo is reprinted here in its entirely for the interested readership of THE STATE.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 6, Nov 1976, p23-25, il, por
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Record #:
9591
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In 1916, Thomas Wolfe joined the Dialectic Literary Society at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Although often late or absent from meetings, his work in oration can be seen in the rhetoric he employed in his novels. Although Wolfe remained a member throughout his college career, he became more involved in the campus newspaper during his senior year, and his literary society activities suffered.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 10, Mar 1977, p12-13, 22, il, por
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Record #:
9891
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Dr. Michael L. Furcolow, an authority on fungus diseases, believes that Thomas Wolfe (1900-1938) died of a disease commonly known as desert or valley fever rather than the original diagnosis, tuberculosis of the brain.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 4, Sept 1973, p18-20, 30, por, map
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Record #:
9923
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North Carolina novelist Tom Wolfe attended the 1936 Olympics in Berlin as a guest of the U.S. Ambassador to Germany William E. Dodd. Wolfe, who was an avid sports fan, was seated in the diplomatic box and is believed by Ambassador Dodd's daughter to have annoyed Hitler with loud “war whoops” in celebration of Jesse Owens's historic track and field victories.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 7, Sept 1972, p13-14, por
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Record #:
10248
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Some of Thomas Wolfe's fellow citizens in Asheville did not appreciate it when he began writing novels with the city and some of her citizens as background. Rogers recounts the life of North Carolina's greatest writer.
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Record #:
10703
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Despite having been dead for more than three decades, Tom Wolfe played a part in the recent moon landings that were broadcast on national television. Excerpts from his essay, \"What Is Man\" were read during the live broadcast, which many believe increased the amount of respect that will be given to both the man and his work.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 11 , Nov 1969, p17-18, por
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Record #:
10731
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The account that Thomas Wolfe's mother gave him of a Mitchell county triple murder served as his inspiration for his short story, \"The Web of Earth,\" which was published in a volume of his collected pieces titled FROM DEATH TO MORNING. The triple slaying that Wolfe used as the basis for this story occurred in 1885 at the Miller-Horton mica mine just off present State Highway 226, approximately four miles north of Spruce Pine. Wolfe's mother also related her involvement in the case to her son, specifically her having given shoes to the escaped convicts that had been convicted of the killings and jailed in Asheville.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 18, Feb 1970, p15-16, por
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Record #:
12323
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Fred Wolfe, cast as \"Luke Gant\" in his brother Thomas Wolfe's novel Look Homeward, Angel, spoke at the May 5, 1973 ceremony at the Thomas Wolfe Memorial in Asheville. He accepted a plaque designating the memorial as a national historic site. Fred Wolfe occasionally guided tour groups through the historic \"Old Kentucky Home\" known in the novel as \"Dixieland.\"
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 10, Mar 1974, p8-10, il
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