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15 results for Naturalists
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Record #:
3677
Author(s):
Abstract:
From 1869 to 1870, David Coues was Army surgeon at Fort Macon. He spent endless hours studying the wildlife and writing about it. His efforts put Bogue Banks on the naturalist's map. Coues later became the foremost ornithologist of his time.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 1998, p24-26, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4061
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Bartram, son of the famous royal botanist, John Bartram, left Philadelphia in 1773, on a four-year botanizing expedition across the Southeast. When he returned in 1777, he had categorized over 100 plants and 215 birds and had written an incomparable travel epic. The University of Georgia Press has recently reissued the narrative.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Winter 1999, p8-9, il
Record #:
4141
Author(s):
Abstract:
One hundred years before Audubon began painting birds, Mark Catesby was painting birds in colonial America. Called the \"Colonial Audubon,\" Catesby published NATURAL HISTORY OF CAROLINA, FLORIDA, and BAHAMAS in England between the years 1731 and 1743. The book contains 109 bird illustrations, 20 color plates, and text. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Press has recently reissued the book in paperback.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 46 Issue 2, Spring 1999, p10-11, il
Record #:
4578
Abstract:
H. H. and C. S. Brimley, immigrant English boys, came to Raleigh in 1880. Herbert became an outstanding taxidermist and worked for the Museum of Natural Science for sixty years, fifty-one as curator and director. Clement was an entomologist for the Agriculture Department and published the first catalog of insects in the South, The List of Insects of North Carolina. The Brimleys were the state's most influential naturalists, whose work left a lasting mark on the state. They are remembered in an exhibit at the new North Carolina Museum of Natural Science in Raleigh.
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Record #:
8772
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Abstract:
Eustace Conway, age twenty, is known as the Mountain Man of the Piedmont. Living in a teepee in Lincoln County, Conway reads Walden and is completely self-reliant. He eats mostly fruit and peanut butter and believes in living in harmony with nature and not in competition with it. For this reason, he rarely kills animals or even plants. A true outdoorsman, in 1981, Conway hiked the Appalachian Trail, a 2,200-mile trip, in sixteen weeks. He canoed from St. Louis to New Orleans, a 1,030-mile trip, in a month.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Apr 1982, p16-17, il, por
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Record #:
9623
Author(s):
Abstract:
Natural William Bartram began keeping notebooks on the natural history of the Blue Ridge and Smoky Mountains in 1775. Because of strained relations with North Carolina Indian tribes, he did his work alone and without the help of a guide. Eventually he reached the Cherokee Middle Towns near present-day Franklin in Macon County, where he was welcomed. It is from this point that his journal details descriptions of the Cherokee. His journals, first published in 1791, describe the earliest days of North Carolina and also provide an ethnology of the Indians.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 11, Apr 1977, p21-22, il, map
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Record #:
6569
Author(s):
Abstract:
H. H. and C. S. Brimley, immigrant English boys, came to Raleigh in 1880. Herbert became an outstanding taxidermist and worked for the Museum of Natural Science for sixty years, fifty-one as curator and director. Clement was an entomologist for the Agriculture Department and published the first catalog of insects in the South, The List of Insects of North Carolina. The Brimleys were the state's most influential naturalists, whose work left a lasting mark on the state
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 1, Mar 1979, p1-14, por, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
8913
Abstract:
H. H. and C. S. Brimley, immigrant English boys, came to Raleigh in 1880. Herbert became an outstanding taxidermist and worked for the Museum of Natural Science for sixty years, fifty-one as curator and director. Clement was an entomologist for the Agriculture Department and published the first catalog of insects in the South, The List of Insects of North Carolina. The Brimleys were the state's most influential naturalists, whose work left a lasting mark on the state.
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Record #:
8914
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In the conclusion of her article on the Brimley brothers, Green discusses further contributions the two naturalists made to the State Museum of Natural History in Raleigh.
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Record #:
8927
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Abstract:
Harry Davis was born at Cape Hatteras in 1896 was educated at Beaufort High School. Later, Davis graduated as a geologist from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1920 and became the assistant director at the State Museum in Raleigh, where H. H. Brimley was director. One of Davis's most memorable tasks was the recovery of a mammoth sperm whale carcass that washed up at Wrightsville Beach on April 6, 1926.
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Record #:
8631
Author(s):
Abstract:
One hundred years before Audubon began painting birds, Mark Catesby was painting birds, plants, and animals in colonial America. Called the \"Colonial Audubon,\" Catesby published NATURAL HISTORY OF CAROLINA, FLORIDA, BAHAMAS in England between the years 1731 and 1743. The book, containing 109 bird illustrations, twenty color plates, and text, was a pioneering work in the field of scientific illustration.
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Record #:
2892
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John Bartram, botanist to King George III, and his son William, were eminent naturalists who traveled the Carolinas and the Southeast collecting botanical specimens. William's 1791 book, TRAVELS, is considered a landmark of early botanical study.
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Record #:
8301
Author(s):
Abstract:
H. H. and C. S. Brimley, immigrant English boys, came to Raleigh in 1880. Herbert became an outstanding taxidermist and worked for the Museum of Natural Science for sixty years, fifty-one as curator and director. Clement was an entomologist for the Agriculture Department. He published over two hundred animal-related papers and two landmark books, The List of Insects of North Carolina and Birds of North Carolina. The Brimleys were the state's most influential naturalists, whose work left a lasting mark on the state.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p34-35, il, por
Record #:
28538
Author(s):
Abstract:
The work of Jessica Potter-Bowers, Lauren Brown, and their Two Sisters Farmstead School is detailed. The school provides natural science education in an academic outdoor classroom for children 3-18. The school teaches naturalist skills, encourages healthy eating practices, permaculture, and farmsteading practices.
Record #:
36483
Author(s):
Abstract:
For European explorers, natural historians, and botanists traversing the territory now known as North America, nature walks had at least two purposes. They were commissioned to find herbs to take back to the Old World and become familiar with the land their host countries intended to colonize. Naturalist William Bartram’s journey covered the Appalachian Mountains to Florida, as well as throughout the southeast to the Mississippi River. His chronicles, published collectively as Bartram’s Travels, may serve as an apt guide for those following the trail memorializing his journey. Within are a wealth of specimens, drawings, and observations about the people and landscape he encountered between 1773-1777.