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9 results for Brimley, Herbert Hutchinson (H.H.), 1861-1946
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Record #:
4578
Abstract:
H. H. and C. S. Brimley, immigrant English boys, came to Raleigh in 1880. Herbert became an outstanding taxidermist and worked for the Museum of Natural Science for sixty years, fifty-one as curator and director. Clement was an entomologist for the Agriculture Department and published the first catalog of insects in the South, The List of Insects of North Carolina. The Brimleys were the state's most influential naturalists, whose work left a lasting mark on the state. They are remembered in an exhibit at the new North Carolina Museum of Natural Science in Raleigh.
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Record #:
25521
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In 1934, Herbert Brimley examined remains of a whale shark found in Carolina Beach, North Carolina. Despite an increase of knowledge since that discovery, still not much is known about whale sharks. Scientists do not know where whale sharks give birth, or how many are in the ocean, or even how long they live.
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Record #:
6569
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H. H. and C. S. Brimley, immigrant English boys, came to Raleigh in 1880. Herbert became an outstanding taxidermist and worked for the Museum of Natural Science for sixty years, fifty-one as curator and director. Clement was an entomologist for the Agriculture Department and published the first catalog of insects in the South, The List of Insects of North Carolina. The Brimleys were the state's most influential naturalists, whose work left a lasting mark on the state
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 1, Mar 1979, p1-14, por, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
8913
Abstract:
H. H. and C. S. Brimley, immigrant English boys, came to Raleigh in 1880. Herbert became an outstanding taxidermist and worked for the Museum of Natural Science for sixty years, fifty-one as curator and director. Clement was an entomologist for the Agriculture Department and published the first catalog of insects in the South, The List of Insects of North Carolina. The Brimleys were the state's most influential naturalists, whose work left a lasting mark on the state.
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Record #:
8914
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In the conclusion of her article on the Brimley brothers, Green discusses further contributions the two naturalists made to the State Museum of Natural History in Raleigh.
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Record #:
733
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H. H. and C. S. Brimley immigrated in 1870 from England to Raleigh, where their inexhaustible interest in the natural world left a lasting mark on NC. The state Museum of Natural Sciences is the most visible record of their achievements.
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Record #:
8301
Author(s):
Abstract:
H. H. and C. S. Brimley, immigrant English boys, came to Raleigh in 1880. Herbert became an outstanding taxidermist and worked for the Museum of Natural Science for sixty years, fifty-one as curator and director. Clement was an entomologist for the Agriculture Department. He published over two hundred animal-related papers and two landmark books, The List of Insects of North Carolina and Birds of North Carolina. The Brimleys were the state's most influential naturalists, whose work left a lasting mark on the state.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p34-35, il, por
Record #:
34719
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Whale sharks are occasional visitors to the coast of North Carolina, especially when warmer-than-average water travels up from the south. In 1934, a whale shark larger than 40 feet long was found dead in the Cape Fear River; Herbert Hutchinson Brimley, affiliate of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, was able to record the tail and create part of an exhibition. Since then, the whale shark has become a much more active part of the North Carolina ecosystem.
Record #:
38019
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Article about H. H. Brimley hunting in Currituck County and the poem, ‘The Waterfowl of Currituck.’