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19 results for Cape Fear River
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Record #:
4931
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The Cape Fear River rises near Greensboro and empties into the Atlantic Ocean at Wilmington. The entire river basin covers over 9,000 square miles. Along the waterway lie 107 cities and towns and a population of almost two million. Preserving the water quality requires cooperation and flexibility among many groups. Smith discusses current plans to protect the waterway.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2001, p6-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
13221
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Navigation on the Cape Fear River is tricky, and no master would attempt it without the knowledge of one of the seven licensed captains in the Wilmington-Cape Fear Pilots Association. The Association is a unique group rooted in the romantic traditions of the Civil War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 26, May 1956, p8-9, f
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Record #:
14413
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For almost a quarter of a century, Captain Harry Weeks has been putting pilots aboard ships that are bound up the Cape Fear River to Wilmington.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 19, Oct 1947, p3-4, f
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Record #:
15130
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Iron mining was a one time a quite sizable industry in the Upper Cape Fear River region. There is a large body of rich ore particularly in Chatham County where numerous mills and blast furnaces took advantage of the many tributaries of the Cape Fear River.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 45, Apr 1941, p8-9, 20, f
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Record #:
17766
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The Cape Fear River is more than just a certain volume of water, it is a living system with a breathless story, like an artery from the sea to the mountains of North Carolina.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p186-188, 190, 192, 194, 196-197, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
24048
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Kemp Burdette is a riverkeeper for the Cape Fear River, one of the most important natural resources in North Carolina. Burdette's job is to protect the river from short term--often destructive thinking--and ensure that it will last for the generations to come.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 4, September 2015, p142-144, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24343
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Smithfield Foods of Virginia hopes to build a hog plant in Bladen County along the Cape Fear River. Though the proposed plant would bring money and jobs to the economically depressed area, many are worried about the environmental impacts the plant would have on the already polluted Cape Fear River.
Record #:
24534
Author(s):
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Yankee forces during the American Civil War tried to bottle up the Cape Fear River to keep Confederates from getting supplies. Fort Fisher was the main reason the inlet was not closed by the Yankees, until Major General Benjamin F. ‘Beast’ Butler created a floating ship bomb that was supposed to strike Fort Fisher. This article discusses the idea and methodology for creating a ship bomb.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 7, December 1977, p10-14, il
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Record #:
26346
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The Cape Fear River drainage system has received some new inhabitants when the NCWRC stocked it River and some of its tributaries with 32,000 spotted bass fingerlings.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 3, Summer 1978, p22
Record #:
26434
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first stocking of striped bass has occurred in coastal North Carolina. The Cape Fear River became home to around 20,000 striped bass, some of which have been tagged for further experimentation.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 3, Mar 1980, p16
Record #:
22009
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Abstract:
This article examines the founding and history of Clarendon County on the Cape Fear. Settled by English colonists from the island of Barbados, Clarendon County ultimately failed as a major colonial settlement in the southern colonies.
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Record #:
28174
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The present status of longnose gar, Lepisosteus osseus (family Lepisosteidae) in North Carolina is reviewed, with emphasis on those captured in the Cape Fear River. Distribution, abundance, and length-weight relationships were compared to studies from other freshwater areas.
Record #:
33167
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hydrilla, a noxious aquatic weed plant, was recently identified in Woodlake in Moore County, North Carolina. This is the largest infestation found in the state and the first major infestation in the Cape Fear River Drainage Basin.
Record #:
33356
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Abstract:
The Cape Fear River Basin Study was a two-year effort to address the most critical water issues in North Carolina’s largest river basin. The study, which concluded in 1984, focused on water supply, wetlands, and instream flow needs for fish habitat. A summary report provides a synopsis of the study’s major findings and accomplishments.
Record #:
34719
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Abstract:
Whale sharks are occasional visitors to the coast of North Carolina, especially when warmer-than-average water travels up from the south. In 1934, a whale shark larger than 40 feet long was found dead in the Cape Fear River; Herbert Hutchinson Brimley, affiliate of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, was able to record the tail and create part of an exhibition. Since then, the whale shark has become a much more active part of the North Carolina ecosystem.