NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for Hydrilla
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
26959
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hydrilla is a fast growing aquatic plant creating dense surface mats which impede water flow in canals, reduce water storage in reservoirs, and interfere with recreation and navigation. In 1980, hydrilla was found in Big Lake, located in North Carolina’s Umstead State Park. Research is currently being done to determine how to enact effective hydrilla management.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Nov/Dec 1982, p12
Subject(s):
Record #:
22659
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hydrilla, an invasive species to North Carolina's coastal waters, is being examined by North Carolina Sea Grant specialists in conjunction with Chowan Edenton Environment Group (CEEG) and the Chowan Soil and Water Conservation District in order to reduce the spread. Along with this project, North Carolina is developing an Aquatic Nuisance Species Plan to deal with such invasive species.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2015, p34-37, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
33167
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hydrilla, a noxious aquatic weed plant, was recently identified in Woodlake in Moore County, North Carolina. This is the largest infestation found in the state and the first major infestation in the Cape Fear River Drainage Basin.
Record #:
33177
Author(s):
Abstract:
Aquatic plant researchers have observed hydrilla seed production for the first time in a natural setting. The seeds were found in two Wake County ponds last fall. Control strategies have been planned accordingly, with strong emphasis given to educational efforts.
Subject(s):
Record #:
33405
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although several noxious aquatics are being considered for inclusion in North Carolina’s Aquatic Weed Control Program, all control efforts to date have focused on hydrilla and alligator-weed. This article discusses the distribution of infestation and where control efforts have been effective.
Record #:
34031
Author(s):
Abstract:
The control of undesirable aquatic weeds in drainage canals, rivers, and lakes in North Carolina continues to be of concern to water managers. Surveys conducted last summer and fall by the Division of Water Resources determined that at least thirty-six counties are infested with hydrilla and alligator weed.
Record #:
34161
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s Clean Lakes Program is restoring two lakes in Umstead State Park for swimming and other recreational uses. Restoration efforts include ridding the lakes of hydrilla infestation and correcting sedimentation problems. The condition of the lakes will also be assessed for the level of nutrients, algae, and water quality.