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3 results for Invasive plants--North Carolina, Coastal
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Record #:
9996
Author(s):
Abstract:
Drought, high, salinities, extended higher water temperatures, and low-turbidity due to a lack of ocean storms created conditions in 2007 that attracted a nuisance invasive called animal grass to the coastline from Carteret to Dare Counties. Angione describes this invasive that caused fishermen problems by closing fishing nets.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2008, p23-25, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
22659
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hydrilla, an invasive species to North Carolina's coastal waters, is being examined by North Carolina Sea Grant specialists in conjunction with Chowan Edenton Environment Group (CEEG) and the Chowan Soil and Water Conservation District in order to reduce the spread. Along with this project, North Carolina is developing an Aquatic Nuisance Species Plan to deal with such invasive species.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2015, p34-37, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
28261
Abstract:
Phragmites australis, also known as common reed, is a major invasive species that inhabits much of the coastal marshland in the southeastern United States. This study examined the viability of using combined remote sensing and GIS techniques to improve accuracy in the mapping and management of the reed in Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, located near the North Carolina and Virginia border.