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9 results for Fort Fisher (N.C. : Fort)--Siege, 1864-1865
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Record #:
24484
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Abstract:
Fort Fisher was the largest and strongest earthwork fort of its time. Union troops hoped to bomb the fort using a ship loaded with explosives. The bomb was designed by General Benjamin F. ‘Beast’ Butler (1818-1893). Though the bomb failed, a second attack on the fort using a land assault and a naval bombardment brought the surrender of Fort Fisher.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 8, January 1978, p14-17, il
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Record #:
24534
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Yankee forces during the American Civil War tried to bottle up the Cape Fear River to keep Confederates from getting supplies. Fort Fisher was the main reason the inlet was not closed by the Yankees, until Major General Benjamin F. ‘Beast’ Butler created a floating ship bomb that was supposed to strike Fort Fisher. This article discusses the idea and methodology for creating a ship bomb.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 7, December 1977, p10-14, il
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Record #:
28160
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Early in the American Civil War the Union blockaded the southern states’ main ports. Wilmington was the last significant port that could harbor blockade runners to assist the Confederacy. The fort was finally taken by Union forces led by Alfred H. Terry on January 15, 1865.
Record #:
28667
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This article continues from the previous issue, providing details about the Confederate States Marine Corps in Wilmington and course of the battle at Fort Fisher, North Carolina.
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Record #:
28345
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Despite the Union recognizing that the Cape Fear should be targeted early in the Civil War, steps for an assault on Fort Fisher did not occur until September of 1864. General Benjamin Butler formalized a plan to detonate a ship, the “Louisiana” near the walls of Fort Fisher to aid in an assault of the Confederate stronghold. Storms and a lack of communication resulted in the failed explosion of the “Louisiana” on December 24, 1864.
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Record #:
36096
Abstract:
Picking up where earlier researchers had left off with MODERN GREECE were eleven ECU’s maritime studies students. An early casualty of the Union, this blockade runner was found in the early 1960s. This team resumed the work of examining, cataloging, and describing the 11,500 artifacts from the ship sunk off the coast of Fort Fisher. Among those items were tableware, seen in an accompanying photo.
Record #:
37606
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chronicled is Wilmington’s Fort Fisher on December 24th, 1864, and January 13th, 1865. Key players in the battles hinting the Confederacy’s end: Union Generals Sherman and Grant; Confederate Generals Lamb, Whiting, and Bragg. Factors contributing to the outcome were General Whiting’s garrison outnumbered 6 to 1 during the second assault and General Bragg’s belief in Fort Fisher’s invulnerability.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 7, December 2014, p193-194, 196, 198, 200, 202, 204, por Periodical Website
Record #:
37637
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Abstract:
An approach General Sherman became famous for—high risks actions yielding great victories—worked on the battlefield and off. On the battlefield illustrations took him and his combined forces, the Army of the Tennessee and Georgia, through Goldsboro, Fayetteville, and Wilmington before reaching South Carolina’s capital by February 1865. It was in Columbia the battle Sherman believed hastened the end of the war took place, one that, like his march through Atlanta, culminated in a great fire.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 9, February 2015, p151-152, 154, 156, 158, 160 Periodical Website
Record #:
38064
Author(s):
Abstract:
A major source of materials goods for the Confederacy and its troops, Fort Fisher’s attack challenged General Braxton Bragg’s boast of its impenetrability and the South’s victory. The Union armada of 64 ships such as the Colorado, Powhatan, and Wabash assures the defeat, despite the efforts of military leaders such as Fort Fisher’s commander, Colonel William Lamb.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 6, November 2014, p201-202, 204, 206, 208, 201, 212 Periodical Website