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66 results for Gerard, Philip
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Record #:
11827
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Beneath the waters of the Pasquotank River near Elizabeth City lie relics of sunken barges. Once common on the waterway, they were a major mover of commerce before the advent of trucking, railroads, and air travel. Allegood reports on the work of East Carolina University graduate students who are documenting the abandoned vessels. There are at least sixty barges, and they represent the most extensive collection of abandoned vessels found in North Carolina.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2009, p12-15, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
14315
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In this third of an eight-part series on the Civil War, Gerard discusses the leadership of Zebulon Baird Vance, Colonel of the 26th North Carolina Regiment and the wartime Governor of North Carolina.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 2, July 2011, p46-48, 50-51, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
15237
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For the first two years of the Civil War captured soldiers were exchanged and allowed to return to their units. Soon commanders on both sides realized this was an untenable situation, and each made plans for a prison system. Gerard describes North Carolina's infamous prison at Salisbury, where over 15,000 prisoners were held in miserable sanitary conditions and food and clothing were scarce. Prisoners lived in holes dug into the ground. Over 5,000 died. On April 12, 1865, General George Stoneman assaulted Salisbury, liberating the remaining prisoners and burning the prison and the town.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 5, Oct 2011, p66-68, 70, 72, 74-76, 78, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15565
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During the Civil War an opposition group to the fighting developed in North Carolina. Called the Heroes of America and headquartered to the west of Raleigh in nine counties, the group was a highly secret society that did everything possible to undermine the efforts of the Confederacy to win independence. One of the more vocal leaders of the Peace Movement was William Woods Holden, the editor of the NORTH CAROLINA STANDARD.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 6, Nov 2011, p66-68, 70, 72, 74, 76, 78, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15674
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In the last of Gerard's his eight-part series on the Civil War, he writes devastation is synonymous with the Civil War and affected not only beleaguered troops from both sides but a large population left behind; women. With men off fighting the war, women were left behind to cope with everyday life, but this everyday existence differed between dissimilar socio-economic groups. Those who enjoyed a privileged life before conflict continued to live with some degree of comfort and when war threatened too close, these women could pick-up and move away. Middle-class and lower-class women experienced greater degrees of hardship and much sooner into the conflict. Yet no segment of the female population suffered more than African-Americans, abandoned by husbands or abused by Confederate and Union troops alike.
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Record #:
15675
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In Gerard's introduction to his eight-part series on the Civil War, he writes Dr. John D. Bellamy was the epitome of Southern gentry; unfailingly loyal to the Confederacy and profiting from slave labor. Bellamy owned three plantations and approximately 1,000 slaves, the profits from just one plantation paid for his family's mansion in downtown Wilmington. After the outbreak of war, Bellamy sent a contingency of his slaves to construct sand forts along Cape Fear River with no compensation from the Confederate Government. Bellamy and his family later fled Wilmington, the town he helped fortify, after the yellow fever outbreak in 1862 to find refuge at Floral College.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 12, May 2011, p64-72, 74, 76, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
15678
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Part five of Gerard's eight-part series on the Civil War is about William Henry Asbury Speer of Yadkin represents the conflicted Confederate soldier; hesitant to fight but determined to defend his state. He was appointed captain of Company I, 28th Regiment of North Carolina Troops. During the course of the war he would be captured and transported to several northern prisoner of war camps, returned to service, and placed in charge of troops in almost every major engagement. He perished at the Battle of Reams' Station near Petersburg, Virginia in 1864.
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Record #:
15676
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In part two of Gerard's eight-part series on the Civil War, he writes pre-Civil War spirits amongst the state's volunteer army were as brazen as the newly stitched uniforms and flags worn and carried by so many young North Carolinians. Unfortunately for these men, their finery outmatched weaponry; most troops armed with the family's hunting rifle or state provided surplus rifles from the Revolutionary War. Their attitudes were born from a sense of righteous cause and \"no cultural memory of defeat.\"
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 1, June 2011, p66-70, 72, 74-75, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15677
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Part four of Gerard's eight-part series on the Civil War is about many of the runaway slaves from the eastern portion of the state who stole away along the rivers and swamps, desperately trying to reach the ocean and the \"nautical Underground Railroad.\" Before the war, slaves fled oppressive lives for a chance of freedom in the north but during the war many runaway slaves took up the Union's fight. Taking advantage of war time chaos, runaway slaves fled to the Atlantic shore and enlisted with either the Union Army or Navy.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 3, Aug 2011, p56-58, 60, 62, 64-65, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15794
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During the Civil War the Confederate States sent over 150 military bands along with the regiments when they went off to war. The Union sent twice that number. Focusing on the band of the 26th Regiment North Carolina Troops, Gerard relates how a regimental band functioned.
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Record #:
15937
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Music was an integral part of people's lives before, during, and following the Civil War. Men drafted into service brought with them music from their region which mixed with songs, sounds, and styles from across America. Songs would be an emotional outlet during the Civil War, whether to stir troops with a rallying tune or mourn death through somber ballad.
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Record #:
16224
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During the Civil War, the Confederate army was lacking for many provisions and services, none as dire as the lack of medical personnel and supplies. There were only 8,000 Confederate doctors and only two ambulances per regiment of 2,000 troops. Of the medical staff, many lacked formal training and were unprepared to treat gunshot wounds or trauma.
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Record #:
16544
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In Shelton Laurel Valley in Madison County, which was a Unionist stronghold, thirteen men and boys suspected of Unionism were killed by Confederate soldiers on or about January 18, 1863. The controversial event outraged Governor Zebulon Vance. While the massacre destroyed the career of one of the perpetrators, the one who ordered the executions was never brought to justice.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 12, May 2012, p70-72, 74, 76, 78, 80, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
16601
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Dr. Thomas Fanning Wood served as surgeon of the 3rd Regiment North Carolina Troops during the Civil War. Gerard recounts his activities during the war at battles including Chancellorsville and Gettysburg and describes the conditions under which the medical staff worked. At the end of the conflict Wood returned to Wilmington and began his medical practice.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 11, Apr 2012, p72-74, 76, 78-80, 82, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
16811
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Gerard recounts the events leading to the attempted recapture of New Bern in January 1864 and the decisions made by certain Confederate soldiers which eventually led to their hanging in Kinston.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 1, June 2012, p58-60, 62, 64-66, 68, il, por Periodical Website
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