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14 results for Artifacts
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Record #:
16578
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In 1974, H. G. Jones learned that Gilliam and Annette Wood, owners of Edenton's historic 1814-1817 Hayes Plantation House, were interested in donating the contents of Hayes' rare, intact, 19th century gentleman's library to the North Carolina Collection at UNC-Chapel Hill. With the transfer and restoration of the library's contents underway, a replica of the original library was suggested, as well as a book about the Hayes Plantation.
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Record #:
16714
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A project to construct additional parking in Raleigh led to the discovery of a time capsule from 1860. Staff archaeologist John W. Clauser halted construction on the hunch that the monument, to be destroyed during construction, be inspected further. Clauser's hunch was correct and a rusted tin box contained illegible papers, parts of scripture, antebellum coins, railroad artifacts, and various tools.
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Record #:
20563
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The National Soccer Hall of Fame was once located in Oneonta, New York. The institution closed its doors in 2010 and the museum's collections is now stored in a Hillsborough warehouse. The author discusses the vast amount of history in storage, the history of the former soccer museum, and argues for the erection of a new facility to house soccer's artifacts dating back to the 1860s when the first American soccer match occurred.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 33, Aug 2013, p19-21, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24843
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While many specimens are kept at the Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh, this swordfish bill is a mystery when it comes to its origins. While museum staff know the identity of the immediate donors of the swordfish bill, its provenance remains unknown.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Winter 2016, p11, il
Record #:
25561
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The Special Collections division at Joyner Library on East Carolina’s campus is full of many great historically valuable items. From WWII propaganda posters to a Lost Colony signet ring, these artifacts are presentative of centuries of American history and culture.
Record #:
30751
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Built in 1734, St. Thomas Episcopal Church is the oldest church in North Carolina and is located in the town of Bath. Reverend John Garzia, the first rector called to serve at the church, brought several gifts to the parish. These gifts, which are still displayed in the church, include royal candelabras, Bibles, and a silver chalice believed to be one of the oldest communion cups in existence.
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Record #:
30913
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A pen used in the signing of North Carolina's Constitution was returned from a homestead near Bangor, Maine. The pen, owned and used by Fred F. French of Bladen County, was found during a renovation of the Maine homestead and returned by the town manager of Lincoln, Maine.
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Record #:
31687
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Last July, a group of relic collectors were caught stealing three cannons from Fort Branch, a Civil War fort on the Roanoke River near Hamilton. The incident led to the installation of a new security light and considerable interest in the old fort and cannons. This article discusses restoration efforts at the fort, and local citizens’ opinions on security measures.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, May 1973, p20-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
37306
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The Historic Bath Foundation opened an exhibit hall in a renovated section of the town’s old high school building. Bringing history to life were exhibits such as Blackbeard, featuring an historic interpreter for the pirate who had a house in Bath. Putting history on display were artifacts, such as Theodore DeBry illustrations from 1590; historic maps; and antique firearms. Preserving history was extended to maintaining much of the original architectural structure of the 1920s building while adding a library, gallery, gift shop, and town offices.
Record #:
37261
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Described was the labor of love involved in the restoration of a lathe originally owned by Charles Henry Hall. Courtesy of its passage down through the centuries by Hall’s nephew, Charles Hall Ashford, Jr., and L.R. Thomas Jr., the lathe is part of the Palace’s collection of human powered tools.
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The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spring 2015, p8-11
Record #:
35914
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Collector of currently one thousand artifacts was this self-professed self-taught archaeologist. In his profile was information about who inspired him to take up the trade and circumstances surrounding his first acquisition. Included are descriptions of select items from his collection, such as a flint war axe and Cherokee tomahawk.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p26
Record #:
36012
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Were they papers worth far more than the paper they were printed on? That question was prompted by the discovery of documents, letters, and receipts in the former wreck commissioner’s 150 year old house. A photocopied septet of documents, all over 110 years old, were available for readers to decide for themselves whether the items were trash or treasure.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p54-57
Record #:
36096
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Picking up where earlier researchers had left off with MODERN GREECE were eleven ECU’s maritime studies students. An early casualty of the Union, this blockade runner was found in the early 1960s. This team resumed the work of examining, cataloging, and describing the 11,500 artifacts from the ship sunk off the coast of Fort Fisher. Among those items were tableware, seen in an accompanying photo.
Record #:
38279
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Brady C. Jefcoat’s Museum of Americana has items representing American culture from the distant and more recent past. Opened in 1997, it contains the half of Jefcoat’s collection that was not auctioned off and is especially known for its 264 vintage record players and the country's largest collection of butter churns and irons. Despite the Smithsonian being receptive to his request to donate his immense collection, he chose Murfreesboro because the town was willing to display the entirety of his 13,000 treasures.
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