NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


14 results for North Carolina. Constitution
Currently viewing results 1 - 14
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
834
Author(s):
Abstract:
Associate Justice of the NC Supreme Court Harry C. Martin advances the argument that state courts should champion the protection of constitutional rights in the wake of the federal courts' full-scale retreat from the battleground.
Source:
North Carolina Law Review (NoCar K14 0694), Vol. 70 Issue 6, Sept 1992, p1749-1758, bibl, f
Record #:
832
Author(s):
Abstract:
Kenan Professor of Law John V. Orth edits a transcript of the proceedings of the Constitutional Convention of 1868 on the day delegates decided voters should have the right to elect their judges.
Source:
North Carolina Law Review (NoCar K14 0694), Vol. 70 Issue 6, Sept 1992, p1825-1851, bibl, f
Record #:
830
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Constitution's Declaration of Rights offers individuals shelter from state encroachment on certain fundamental civil liberties.
Source:
North Carolina Law Review (NoCar K14 0694), Vol. 70 Issue 6, Sept 1992, p1899-1915, bibl, f
Record #:
833
Abstract:
The potential exists for the judicial advisory authority to jeopardize the balance of power between the three branches of government.
Source:
North Carolina Law Review (NoCar K14 0694), Vol. 70 Issue 6, Sept 1992, p1853-1898, bibl, f
Record #:
836
Abstract:
Retired Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court William Brennan introduces pieces of the North Carolina Constitution's history.
Source:
North Carolina Law Review (NoCar K14 0694), Vol. 70 Issue 6, Sept 1992, p1701-1739, bibl, f
Record #:
837
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chief Justice of the NC Supreme Court James G. Exum, Jr. discusses the Constitution of NC.
Source:
North Carolina Law Review (NoCar K14 0694), Vol. 70 Issue 6, Sept 1992, p1740-1748, bibl, f
Record #:
979
Author(s):
Abstract:
More than a dozen bills have been filed to amend North Carolina's Constitution; issues include gambling on horse races, modifying election proceedings, and considering gubernatorial veto powers.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Mar 1993, p51, por
Record #:
10869
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Constitution of North Carolina was written in 1868 while the state was still under military rule following the Civil War. Many feel it should be rewritten because of its many archaic provisions. Attempts were made in 1933 and 1959 to modernize the document, but both failed. Interestingly, the man who is called the \"father of the N.C. Constitution\" was Albion W. Tourgee, a colorful carpetbagger.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 13, Dec 1967, p9, por
Full Text:
Record #:
10880
Abstract:
The Constitution of North Carolina was written in 1868 while the state was still under military rule following the Civil War. As it marks its one hundredth anniversary, many, including the State Constitution Study Commission, feel it should be rewritten because of its many archaic provisions and dozens of amendments added over the years. The article includes some of the major revision recommendations.
Source:
Record #:
12128
Author(s):
Abstract:
8 September 1956, North Carolina residents will go to the polls and vote on amendments to the state constitution. Mainly dealing with desegregation in schools and educational expenses, this article discusses the upcoming amendments and offers the author's opinion on each.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 7, Aug 1956, p13-15
Full Text:
Record #:
17139
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1933 General Assembly proposed a reconsideration of the state's constitution, a document unchanged since 1868. Revisiting the constitution was deemed necessary after more than a half century of growth and development within the state. All changes are presented in an unbiased manner to inform the voting public.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 1 Issue 4, June 1934, p1-126
Record #:
3173
Author(s):
Abstract:
Disagreement over legislative seat apportionment, the prohibition of persons of various religious faiths from holding office, and other factors led to a call in 1835 for a convention to revise the 1776 state constitution.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Fall 1996, p10-13, il, por
Record #:
30008
Author(s):
Abstract:
One hundred and seventy-six years after the Declaration of Independence was unanimously signed, the United States faces war again. Now the United States and the United Kingdom fight together to defeat similar causes. The Constitution of North Carolina calls for a return to fundamental principles in times such as these.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 1 Issue 3, July 1943, p15, 28-30, por
Record #:
30913
Author(s):
Abstract:
A pen used in the signing of North Carolina's Constitution was returned from a homestead near Bangor, Maine. The pen, owned and used by Fred F. French of Bladen County, was found during a renovation of the Maine homestead and returned by the town manager of Lincoln, Maine.
Source: