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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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16 results for Archaeology and history
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Record #:
70
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recent excavations at the site of the \"new barn\" at Horne Creek Living Historical Farm in Surry County have yielded some interesting finds.
Record #:
14268
Author(s):
Abstract:
Quite a number of Indian mounds have been uncovered in various sections of North Carolina and have yielded much interesting information concerning life of the Indians.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 5, July 1947, p8, 19, f
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Record #:
23629
Author(s):
Abstract:
Near Morganton, North Carolina, the Berry Site Field School educates student archeologists and the public about archeology and history. The site was home to a Native American village called Joara, which was established in the fifteenth century. When the Spaniards explored North America, they journeyed here to build Fort San Juan, the first inland European settlement on the continent. Today, students are uncovering a variety of artifacts and slowly piecing together the story of this cultural interaction.
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Record #:
24936
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Abstract:
Matt Saunders has been going to Belize for years. He regularly brings high school students with him and with their help has found many priceless Mayan archaeological treasures. From Mayan inkwells to rings with new Mayan words that were previously unknown.
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Record #:
28383
Abstract:
The Sewee shell ring, built during the Late Archaic Period, is located on the lower coastal plain of South Carolina. The structural features that appear to have controlled freshwater at the Sewee shell ring are similar to water control dams and weirs identified at South American archaeological sites.
Record #:
28395
Abstract:
Natural water gathering in two newly discovered Carolina bays, designated as Oak Bay and Pine Bay was studied. These bays and the Sewee shell ring, a planned water gathering system built in the Archaic Period, provided a supply of freshwater. This study describes how hunter-gatherers utilized natural landscape features at these coastal archaeological sites.
Record #:
30798
Author(s):
Abstract:
Through a donation of nearly seventy acres and several buildings, North Carolina will establish a Center for Preservation Technology on a portion of the historic Stagville plantation in northern Durham County. The proposed center, a comprehensive research and education facility for historic and archaeological preservation, will be first state facility of its kind in the nation.
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Record #:
35197
Author(s):
Abstract:
As an introduction to this periodical series of articles, Herbert discussed William Haag, an archaeologist who completed an excavation series of coastal sites between 1954-1955. His endeavor paved the road for several future archaeological related activities in Coastal NC. Highlighted was his descriptions of testing and surveying sites along the northern coast of North Carolina. His work laid a foundation for the prehistoric ceramic sequence still in use at the time of this journal’s publication. Also noted among his contributions to the field was a symposium organized for the fifty fifth annual Southern Archaeological Conference. This Conference yielded six of the articles published in this volume.
Record #:
35406
Abstract:
This article is a lead in for “The Last of the Iroquois Potters,” M.R. Harrington’s 1909 study of traditional Cherokee ceramics produced during the Qualla periods in what is now Cherokee, NC. Riggs and Rodning’s article focused on other archaeologists from Harrington’s time and characteristic features of pottery produced particularly during the Qualla periods. Also noted were other discoveries of Iroquois pottery in Southeast regions such as Georgia and the continuation of this pottery’s production into the twenty first century.
Record #:
35405
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1982-2002, archaeological expeditions of the Southern Coastal Plains yielded explanations for unique cultural development patterns among inhabitants such as the Iroquois and Algonkian. Such patterns, referred to by Joel Gunn as a “cultural anvil,” were especially the case during prehistoric periods, as well as global and ice ages. The author explained that this phenomenon occurred because by the Coastal Plain’s lack of natural enclosures. The phenomenon was particularly observed in ceramic artifacts.
Record #:
35112
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1982-2002, archaeological expeditions of the Southern Coastal Plains yielded explanations for unique cultural development patterns among inhabitants such as the Iroquois and Algonkian. Such patterns, referred to by Joel Gunn as a “cultural anvil,” were especially the case during prehistoric periods, as well as global and ice ages. The author explained that this phenomenon occurred because by the Coastal Plain’s lack of natural enclosures. The phenomenon was particularly observed in ceramic artifacts.
Record #:
35113
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article was a lead in for “The Last of the Iroquois Potters,” M.R. Harrington’s 1909 study of traditional Cherokee ceramics produced during the Qualla periods in what is now Cherokee, NC. Brett Riggs and Christopher Rodning’s article focused on other archaeologists from Harrington’s time and characteristic features of pottery produced particularly during the Qualla periods. Also noted were other discoveries of Iroquois pottery in Southeast regions such as Georgia and the continuation of this pottery’s production into the twenty first century.
Record #:
35115
Abstract:
In the past few decades, archaeological expeditions of the Inner Coastal Plain of the South Atlantic Slope have justified the development of a new soil phosphate analysis to determine soil site integrity. Noted by the authors were reasons for the importance of this innovative soil analysis, such as its dependability as a chemical indicator of past human activity.
Record #:
35207
Abstract:
Keith Seramur and Ellen Cowan examined the region’s geographical aspects that encouraged the archaeological developments of residing Native Americans intended to interpret the sedimentary processes of the Holocene and Pleistocene periods. Methods utilized included aerial photographs, soil profiles, and sediment sampling. Conclusions derived: a cultural horizon buried in an Aeolian deposit; shallow and deeper deposits in the excavation sites; sediment erosion on the southwest slope and buildup on the northeastern slope; thicker post-aeolian deposits on the northeastern slope; porous sand and gravel suggesting Native American occupancy. From these conclusions, the author suggested that this model can be used for future Coastal Plain soil studies.
Record #:
35784
Author(s):
Abstract:
Art has found a plenteous place in Dare County. Businesses that offered their places included Carolista Jewelry and Design, Barrier Island Gallery, and My Mother’s Place restaurant. Noted were individuals like printmaker Hubby Blevin (also an amateur archaeologist); New York born painter Jean Montana, and woodcarver Gary Storm. This flow of creative juices suggested something in the water—and air—inspired this bustling colony.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p17S-18S