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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Native Americans- North Carolina
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Record #:
23629
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Abstract:
Near Morganton, North Carolina, the Berry Site Field School educates student archeologists and the public about archeology and history. The site was home to a Native American village called Joara, which was established in the fifteenth century. When the Spaniards explored North America, they journeyed here to build Fort San Juan, the first inland European settlement on the continent. Today, students are uncovering a variety of artifacts and slowly piecing together the story of this cultural interaction.
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Record #:
22526
Abstract:
Many tribes of Indians, the two largest being the Cherokee and Tuscarora, have inhabited nearly every part of North Carolina and given many of the state's icons and places their names.
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Record #:
36973
Abstract:
This Native American mound, in existence since 800AD, currently serves as the sole state historic site dedicated to the heritage of North Carolina’s first natives. With formal excavations starting in the late 1930s, the village also contains one of the longest studied archaeological sites in the United States.
Record #:
37162
Abstract:
This Native American mound, in existence since 800AD, currently serves as the sole state historic site dedicated to the heritage of North Carolina’s first natives. With formal excavations starting in the late 1930s, the village also contains one of the longest studied archaeological sites in the United States.
Record #:
36565
Author(s):
Abstract:
Conquistador Juan Pardo intended to offer Spain a land route from the Appalachia to Mexico, where the country had established silver mines. The threat of Indian attacks at the Great Smokies’ slopes in Tennessee prompted Pardo to abandon the mission and his three forts. The accompanying image of a map created during the time period illustrates the land area representing the present day Southeastern states where Pardo conducted his two expeditions.
Record #:
36576
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mounds built by Native Americans, like the ones featured in the accompanying photo, had purposes both prosaic and sacred. Places like Franklin, Bryson City, Murphy have earthen mounds intact, despite the effects of erosion, plowing, and artifact hunters.
Record #:
36288
Author(s):
Abstract:
A profile of Waxhaw revealed the town, potentially dwarfed by a nearby metropolis, has ways to be noticed. The town incorporated in 1889 and once known as an antique mecca was experiencing growth in areas such as transportation, dining, housing, and the arts.