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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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22 results for Agriculture
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Record #:
206
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This entire issue deals with agricultural predictions for 1992.
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Record #:
4444
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Falling commodity prices, drought, hurricanes, floods, and criticism of tobacco nationwide made 1999 a tough year for farmers. Only one-fourth of the state's farmland escaped Hurricane Floyd's flooding. The cotton crop sustained a $140 million loss, and half the sweet potato crop was lost. Worse yet, the state estimates that 10 to 15 percent of the 55,000 farmers will quit in 2000.
Record #:
7989
Abstract:
Agriculture is the state's top industry, and through the years a number of men and women have been pioneers in the science and art of agriculture and have served as leaders and ambassadors of the agricultural community. The North Carolina Agricultural Hall of Fame, created in 1953, honors the accomplishments of thirty-three men and women. Members include Leonidas L. Polk, Jane S. McKimmon, W. Kerr Scott, Benjamin W. Kilgore, and Ruth A. Current.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p82-84, 86, 88, 90, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10187
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Although North Carolina is known for textiles, furniture, and biotechnology, agriculture remains the state's number one industry, accounting for $68 billion annually. However, since 1990, over a million acres of forest and farms have been lost, mostly to development, and in 2005, over 1,000 farms were lost, the most in any state. To preserve what is left the state is working on projects to help make farming more profitable.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 6, June 2008, p20-22, 24, 26, il
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Record #:
13142
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Despite the fact that the farming population is declining, North Carolina still ranks second to Texas in the number of farms, and fourth in income from crops. Farms in the state have tobacco, dairy cows, sweet potatoes, poultry, peanuts, and apples to name but a few. The value of North Carolina's farm property has increased, as well as the position of farmers and crop yields.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 16, Dec 1955, p23, 25, 27-28, f
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Record #:
16373
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Although today's successful farmer depends on different state and federal agencies for modern agricultural techniques, farmers still rely on phases of the moon, home remedies, and folk practices. Whitehurst presents a series of these practices from Northampton County.
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Record #:
17363
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Commissioner R. Flake Shaw's developed an innovative solution to relieve scores of hungry Guilford County prisoners. In January 1933, the county purchased a farm to be worked by inmates who will help supply food to the 425 individuals who were wards of the county. The farm proved to be an efficient, cost-effective solution to buying prisoners' food from outside sources.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Oct 1935, p3-4, il
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Record #:
18041
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Details concerning the tax code are outlined as far as these concern agricultural and natural resources. Officials evaluated current codes and compared these to Virginia's tax system to relieve tax burdens on the state's farmers. Protecting agricultural land from encroaching urban development and increasing land value assessments was slated for review by the General Assembly the following year.
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Record #:
23657
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Warren Wilson College in Swannanoa successfully runs an agricultural and livestock business and teaches students how to manage a farm.
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Record #:
8298
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Dr. Mike Boyette, an agricultural engineer, has been on the faculty at North Carolina State University for twenty-three years. He is an inventor and designer who works to create better farm equipment, structures, and processes. Shore describes some of his inventions.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p16-17, il
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Record #:
27288
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People have attempted farming in the Mountains for North Carolina for years. This series of articles highlights different farms in the mountains and different crops, including herbs, apples, carrots, and livestock.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 5, October 2016, p166-168, 170,172,174-180, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29706
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The Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians has the oldest living agricultural tradition in southern Appalachia, and saving seeds is an important part of their food ways. Some of the families in North Carolina who still save seed and grow Cherokee vegetable varieties are the Bradley Farm in Big Cove, and the Long Family Farm and Gallery in Murphy.
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Record #:
31391
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In an effort to help lessen the federal deficit, President Reagan has embarked on a farm program of acreage control. The “crop swap” program would give farmers grain from government stockpiles in exchange for the grain they would have grown on the acres they decide not to plant. This article discusses the program and how it would affect North Carolina farmers and agriculture.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 3, Mar 1983, p26-27, il Periodical Website
Record #:
33401
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The 1986 General Assembly appropriated three-million-dollars to the North Carolina Soil and Water Conservation Commission to continue and expand a cost-share program for agricultural non-point source pollution control. This will allow the program to be extended into seventeen additional counties located in the coastal area. Farmers who receive cost sharing will be required to perform certain fertilizer and waste management practices.
Record #:
34473
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This article is a segment of an oral history with Alton Taylor, who recalls taking agricultural produce to Virginia in his father’s sharpie. Vessel dimensions are given, along with details of the trip.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p8