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21 results for Farmers--Economic conditions
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Record #:
4444
Author(s):
Abstract:
Falling commodity prices, drought, hurricanes, floods, and criticism of tobacco nationwide made 1999 a tough year for farmers. Only one-fourth of the state's farmland escaped Hurricane Floyd's flooding. The cotton crop sustained a $140 million loss, and half the sweet potato crop was lost. Worse yet, the state estimates that 10 to 15 percent of the 55,000 farmers will quit in 2000.
Record #:
19861
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recent Federal debate concerning the banning of GMCs or genetically modified crops has the state's farmers concerned for their livelihood. Farmers growing two of the state's biggest crops, soybeans and corn, rely almost exclusively, 90 percent, on GMCs. Public meetings continue to be held by U.S. Fish and Wildlife representatives concerning the planting on refuge lands; currently only 1 percent of the 4 million acres of national wildlife refuge land is cultivated.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
21374
Author(s):
Abstract:
An examination of the changes seen among subsistence based yeoman farmers in the state after the construction in the 1850s of the North Carolina Railroad spanning the state from Goldsboro to Charlotte. Taking advantage of new commercial opportunities afforded by the new railroad, yeoman farmers began to produce cash crops, viewing it as a chance to compete equally in a society that was becoming increasingly capitalist.
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Record #:
26646
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1980 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation indicated that 93 million Americans were involved in some form of nonconsumptive wildlife related activity. Billions of dollars were spent on feeding, photographing, or identifying wildlife. In a time when farm incomes are dropping, North Carolina farmers are turning to wildlife recreation resources for alternative income.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1987, p12, il
Record #:
26643
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is losing a lot of traditional farm land because farmers can’t afford to stay in business. In the past, small-game has been a natural by-product of agriculture since most farm land provides habitat for small animals. As farm losses continue, so do small-game populations.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1987, p6, il
Record #:
27548
Abstract:
Poultry is North Carolina’s biggest crop and many residents make a living in the poultry industry. However, many of those workers and farmers who supply the chickens claim the chickens are treated better by poultry companies than they are. Additionally, poultry is not as healthy as the American public believes as many are being exposed to millions of sick birds every year. The industry traps individuals in low paying jobs, exposes them to poor working conditions, and is endangering public health.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 20, July 20-26 1989, p6-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
28232
Author(s):
Abstract:
A proposed merger would cause Smithfield Packing to have a monopoly on the hog market in North Carolina. If the merger goes through, farmers would have less leverage to negotiate prices for their product. Politicians in the state have been silent on the issue as Smithfield has contributed money to many party committees and political candidates. Farmers in the state speak about concerns and the effects the merger would have on them.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 14, April 2007, p22 Periodical Website
Record #:
30203
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1952, North Carolina's farm income will reach the billion dollar mark for the first time. However, the cost has risen at an even faster rate. For 1953, the farmer will have to efficiently product in order to close the narrowing price-cost gap.
Record #:
30688
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recent study shows that farm families in North Carolina have low income compared to non-farm family incomes in the state. This lower income is most likely attributed to the high proportion of families living on low-production farms and the large number of members per household. Also, farm incomes are highest in areas where industrialization allows farm works to engage in other types of labor along with farming.
Record #:
30767
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to the revised estimates made by the North Carolina Department of Agriculture, over 35,000 fewer people harvested crops from over 258,000 fewer farm acres in 1957 versus 1956. The top crops of corn, cotton, and tobacco all saw a decline in the number of acres farmed with a net loss of over $1 million in principal money crops.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 15 Issue 8, January 1958, p2-3, 18, il, map
Record #:
30970
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite adverse weather conditions in 1959, North Carolina's farm production was good for the year. However, decreased prices cut so sharply into farm income that it has been estimated the total will be about $50 million below the previous year.
Record #:
30993
Author(s):
Abstract:
Farm market and government payments in North Carolina during 1959 reached over $74 million; however, this was 7 percent lower that the preceding year's total of just over $1 billion. Despite this drop in net income per farm, North Carolina still outranks any other state in the southeastern region in total cash receipts.
Record #:
31150
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina State Grange, at work since the 1870s, continues its commitment to improving the quality of rural life through community service, legislative activities and youth leadership programs. The State Grange recently made a case that rural North Carolina and farm families in particular, are going through an economic depression. This article discusses some of their hardships and how Hyde County farmers are expanding their market.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 6, June 2003, p4, por
Record #:
31270
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the expected drop in 1964 tobacco income, North Carolina farmers have several opportunities to help them offset this drop. Given the state's farm economy, there is believed to be enough steam to absorb the tobacco cut without taking a dip in total farm income.
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Record #:
31359
Author(s):
Abstract:
An amendment has been proposed to establish the North Carolina Agricultural Financing Agency, which would issue revenue bonds to finance capital growth in agriculture. The measure would give farmers a tax-exempt financing source for improvements in production, processing, marketing and distribution of any farm products. More efficient and productive farms would ultimately translate into more economical food prices for the consumer.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 16 Issue 4, Apr 1984, p3