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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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24 results for Hog industry
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Record #:
15958
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As the hog farm industry grows in North Carolina, so do the environmental implications that accompany it. This article examines the environmental dangers that the hog farm industry poses to North Carolina's rivers and streams, and addresses the legal protections against regulation by state and federal legislatures against prevention and protection.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Fall 1996, p10-18
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Record #:
15960
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Livestock farm regulation, especially corporate hog farms, is the source of conflict throughout North Carolina. An important part of the State's economy, hog farming has become a significant political issue as well. The debate over hog farm regulation hinges on who should bear the costs of externalities associated with a high level of pork production.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 1997, p38-42, il
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Record #:
16943
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Talbott discusses the revitalization of the small-scale hog industry in North Carolina, looking at food security, animal welfare, environmental concerns, and the use of sub-therapeutic antibiotics.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 10 Issue , 2002, p54-58
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Record #:
21856
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This article examines the importance of pork to the diet of residents of eastern North Carolina. Beginning in colonial North Carolina and continuing to current times, pork continues to be a tradition of the eastern North Carolina.
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Record #:
24137
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Michael Jones used to manage factory hog farms but turned to smaller farming methods that humanely raise hogs that taste better and are hormone free.
Record #:
25200
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A meeting between hog farmers and residents debated concerns over the recent boom in livestock, specifically hogs.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 12 Issue 4, Summer 1993, p1-2, il
Record #:
27258
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North Carolina is home to more hogs than people, and pork is one of the state's top agricultural exports. Pastured pork is a form of resistance against an industrial behemoth, one rife with poor practices and environmental disasters. To combat this, a small but growing number of people in the Triangle area are raising hogs with consideration for the animals' welfare as well as their flavor.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 33, August 2016, p22-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
28232
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A proposed merger would cause Smithfield Packing to have a monopoly on the hog market in North Carolina. If the merger goes through, farmers would have less leverage to negotiate prices for their product. Politicians in the state have been silent on the issue as Smithfield has contributed money to many party committees and political candidates. Farmers in the state speak about concerns and the effects the merger would have on them.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 14, April 2007, p22 Periodical Website
Record #:
28231
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The troubles with unions and workers’ rights at Smithfield’s hog processing plant in Bladen County are detailed. The company has fought the elections of union workers at the plant for years. The fast pace of the processing line has been another problem for workers as there are frequent injuries. Workers from the plant discuss the company’s poor and unsafe working environment.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 14, April 2007, p18-20 Periodical Website
Record #:
28236
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Smithfield Packing is asking the Department of Environmental and Natural Resources to remove essential environmental protections from the Tar Heel plant’s wastewater discharge permit. Smithfield also wants limits lifted on groundwater withdrawal, to requirements rescinded for environmental management systems, and removal of a ban on buying hogs from farms that use waste lagoons. The company is being regulated for many environmental violations and for their excessive use of groundwater, both of which harm local residents and the environment.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 14, April 2007, p23-24 Periodical Website
Record #:
28237
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Hog lagoons or cesspools are the disposal method of waste in the hog industry. However, after 2005, there were no supposed to be any more lagoons in use in the state. The lagoons contaminate groundwater and nearby watersheds and Governor Easely made a deal with industry to do away with the lagoons for a better environmentally and economically feasible method. To date, there has not been an agreed-upon economically feasible method, but some are hoping that research will produce one soon.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 14, April 2007, p23 Periodical Website
Record #:
28239
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The state’s politicians have let Smithfield Packing abuse workers in Tar Heel, and it is time both groups clean up their mess. Smithfield needs to improve working conditions and allow its workers to unionize. The company also needs to improve its plant’s safety, support training and education programs for immigrant Hispanic workers, and stop supporting hog farms which pollute the area water supply. State politicians need to pressure the meatpacker to make these changes to protect workers and the state’s environment.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 15, April 2007, p12 Periodical Website
Record #:
28316
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Mike Jones of Franklin County owns a small farm which raises free-range, natural, and humanely raised hogs. Jones began working with confinement hog farms, but says his conscience prevented him staying in that industry. Jones’ biggest challenge is raising enough hogs to make money while keeping them from damaging their environment. Jones also works as an extension specialist for NC A&T University and encourages other farmers to use sustainable farming practices.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 38, September 2007, p28-29 Periodical Website
Record #:
28749
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Scientists are genetically modify pigs to contain enough human genes to make their organs available for human transplant. Smithfield Foods Inc. employs many workers on hog farms in the state and is looking to develop hog byproducts for transplantation, medical, pharmaceutical, and nutraceutical uses. The current work being done by Smithfield Bioscience and how the new scientific advances might change the industry are discussed.
Record #:
29001
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American Rivers, a national conservation organization, listed North Carolina’s Neuse River as the seventh most endangered river in the United States. They blamed hog and poultry industries for contaminating the waters. Advocates are urging legislators to restore a voluntary buyout program so that water resources can recover.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 13, April 2017, p10, il Periodical Website
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