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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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19 results for Politicians
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Record #:
13548
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Lindsay Warren is retiring as Comptroller General of the United States and is returning to his native home, Washington, North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 48, May 1954, p10-11, 14, f
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Record #:
15942
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During a recent political standoff over extending federal unemployment, those suffering most from the recession shared their personal stories of financial struggles. Citizens hoped their narratives would enlighten lawmakers and politicians who, by popular opinion, seem disconnected from real-life struggles. The outcome was Governor Bev Perdue signing an executive order in favor of unemployment benefit extension.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 3, Jan 2012, p5 Periodical Website
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Record #:
16232
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James Holeman (March 15, 1800-October 17, 1874) was a wealthy farmer and state politician. Nine letters written to his wife while he served on the North Carolina General Assembly are reproduced in this piece.
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Record #:
16802
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Voters for Clean Elections (NCVCE) recently published a report documenting campaign donations from the gas industry to pro-fracking politicians. Ten fracking companies donated to more than $730,000 to 100-plus N.C. Legislators between 2009 and 2011. Robert Rucho, a Republican Senator who sponsored Senate Bill 820 allowing fracking, personally received $20,500 from the companies in NCVCE's study.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 22, May 2012, p7 Periodical Website
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Record #:
17257
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Lawrence recounts the life of Lindsay Warren of Beaufort County, who was a noted lawyer, state legislator and U.S. Congressman.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 6, July 1939, p5, 24, por
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Record #:
17344
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Capus M. Waynick was a member of the State Senate and the Chairman of the Joint Legislative Committee on Constitutional Amendments in the General Assembly of 1933. As part of a two piece debate over revisions to the state constitution, Mr. Waynick offered the pro argument for amending the state constitution.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Nov 1934, p18-23, por
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Record #:
17345
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Mr. Moore presented evidence to counter Mr. Waynick's argument to rework the state constitution in part two of the debate. Mr. Moore served as a member of State Senate for New Bern and was also a member of the Joint Legislative Committee on Constitutional Amendments in the General Assembly of 1933.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Nov 1934, p17, 24-26, por
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Record #:
23443
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles Read was a leading politician in colonial days. In the spring of 1773 he fled his native state of New Jersey, where he faced a long jail sentence for bankruptcy. Read moved to Martinborough, North Carolina, where he died in 1774. Martinborough was renamed Greenesville in 1786. Today, it is believed that Reade Street in Greenville is named for him.
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Record #:
24279
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Charles Taylor is Western North Carolina's most powerful politician, having spent eight years in Raleigh and ten in Washington, D.C. This article presents his political career in North Carolina and his most influential impacts in the state.
Record #:
24301
Author(s):
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Erskine Bowles is the Clinton administration's chief operating officer. This article discusses the impacts Bowles had in the office and throughout Clinton's term, touching on Bowles' background in business and finance.
Record #:
22466
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This article discusses the life and accomplishments of North Carolinian John Branch, who acted in the capacity of Secretary of the Navy in the Cabinet of President Andrew Jackson. It highlights Branch's distinguished service to both North Carolina and the United States during the Revolutionary War as a Lieutenant-Colonel, and in several government positions including Secretary of the Navy, Speaker of the Senate in North Carolina, and a member of the United States Senate and House of Representatives.
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Record #:
22467
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This article provides biographical information and anecdotal stories about George Edmund Badger, the thirteenth Secretary of the US Navy and a North Carolina native. It also touches upon his ten years of service in the US Senate, where his knowledge of naval matters was highly sought and listened to.
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Record #:
27194
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Abstract:
Since Sunday, several North Carolina politicians have offered condolences and sympathies to the families of the forty-nine people murdered at a gay bar in Orlando. These statements were made despite several of the politicians’ history of opposing gay rights and supporting gun control.
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Record #:
27453
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bo Thomas a wealthy fruit-and-vegetable distributor and state legislator from Hendersonville, NC is attempting to become the Democratic Party’s nomination for US Senate. If he is chosen in the primary, Thomas will run against US Senator Jesse Helms for the NC seat. Thomas is an experienced lawmaker unafraid to make bold statements. His comments and attacks on opponents will either help him win support or stop his campaign before it starts. Thomas and his work as a politician and progressive Democrat focused on environmental protection and social issues are profiled.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 17, April 26 - May 2 1990, p7, 11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27871
Author(s):
Abstract:
The political views of Republican Representative Sue Myrick of Charlotte are explored. Myrick has made comments that were offensive to many Muslims about their religion. Also examined is her advisory board membership on The National Council on bible Curriculum in Public Schools. Her support of an organization that is seen as a religious extremist group, but her offensive remarks about religious extremism suggest a double standard held by Myrick between Islam and Christianity.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 9, March 2010, p11 Periodical Website