NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


48 results for Immigrants--North Carolina
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 4
Next
Record #:
19289
Author(s):
Abstract:
Public health advocates are drawing attention to immigrants being denied access to mental health services in Orange and Chantham counties. The problem lies in the \"managed care organizations\" plan which distributes state funds to private providers. Specifically the provider for this area, Cardinal Innovations, is being scrutinized for possible denying or ignoring the health needs of immigrants within these counties.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 12, March 2013, p9-10 Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
21786
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examines a Gaelic charm found in the North Carolina State Archives as the only known 18th century example found in the New World. Written in poorly spelled Scottish Gaelic, the charm was to ward off evil and originated from an 18th century Gaelic community in Cumberland County.
Source:
Record #:
24148
Author(s):
Abstract:
This book excerpt come from 'The Latino Migration Experience in North Carolina: New Roots in the Old North State' and discusses how new immigration has revived old fears about race, resources, and diversity in North Carolina.
Record #:
24165
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hispanic immigration in North Carolina is decreasing. After two decades in which the state had the nation's fastest Hispanic growth, it is unclear why Hispanics have abandoned North Carolina or are arriving at a much slower rate. Some blame the recession and increased illegal immigrant laws.
Record #:
24300
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Hmong people are a minority ethnic group in Lao and many left the country after the Vietnam War for fear of retaliation. This article examines Hmong families living in North Carolina and the types of jobs they seek.
Record #:
24749
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina and the United States at large face the problem of unaccompanied minors who have immigrated from Central America to the United States over the past two decades. Many of these children do not receive proper education or medical care due to legislation and pushback. This article brings to light the struggles of these individuals and their present situation.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 48, December 2015, p12-13, 15-16, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
25597
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asian-Americans, most of them displaced as a result of the Vietnam War, are the nation’s fastest-growing ethnic group. Since 1975, More than 670,000 Southeast Asian refugees have entered the United States. This article focuses on the Chaw family’s departure from Laos to settling in North Carolina.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 19, October 12-25 1984, p1, 12-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26021
Author(s):
Abstract:
Researchers are studying Latino immigrants in North Carolina and the issues they face. According to Altha Cravey, assistant professor of geography, the temporary and fluid domestic and social arrangements constructed by Latino immigrants save money for the United States. However, Latinos struggle for access to health care, education, and civil rights.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Spring 2004, p18-25, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
26033
Author(s):
Abstract:
Karla Rosenberg focused her senior honors thesis on the impact of Latino immigration on a native black community. She interviewed blacks and Latinos about their community, work, and fair wages. There was no hostility between communities regarding jobs, but competition existed among those without education and high-tech skills.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Fall 2002, p18-19, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
26216
Author(s):
Abstract:
Martha Nelson, a master’s candidate in folklore, has been studying and photographing Mexican immigrants in North Carolina. She focuses on how geographic dislocation results in shifting personal and cultural identities.
Source:
Record #:
27149
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wake County participates in an Immigration and Customs Enforcement program known as 287(g), which delegates immigration authority to local law enforcement to deport illegal immigrants. However, opposition to the program advocate for programs that would help immigrants obtain legal status.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 20, May 2016, p10, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
27257
Abstract:
Oscar Diaz of Jose and Sons, the premier Mexican-Southern restaurant in downtown Raleigh, regularly dines at El Taco Market. While there is a trend for authentic tacos, palates are changing as diverse cultures in North Carolina merge. As a Southern-born Mexican-American in Raleigh, Diaz combines ingredients to produce a menu featuring meals rooted in cultures on both sides of the border.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 33, August 2016, p20-21, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
27268
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nineteen-year-old Wildin Acosta is back in Durham after being detained for six months by Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Acosta fled Honduras to escape violence, but after missing an immigration court hearing in the U.S., he was sentenced to be deported. The Board of Immigration Appeals reconsidered his case and released him.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
27530
Abstract:
The flea market at the Hickory American Legion Fairgrounds in Newton, North Carolina offers an international variety of produce and street food. The diversity is largely due to the region’s roots in manufacturing, and immigrant groups, such as the Hmong and Mayans, who brought their farming traditions with them.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 9, February 2017, p102-108, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27532
Abstract:
On Ocracoke Island, where old-timers claim kin from Blackbeard’s day, a new community is taking shape. Most of the newcomers are from Hidalgo, Mexico, and many are from the same extended family. The two cultures may not speak the same native language, but they understand that the best way to weather change is together.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 9, February 2017, p116-120, il, por Periodical Website