NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


17 results for Cruze, Sidney
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
6263
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Occoneechee Speedway in Orange County opened in 1949. The track was one of only three East Coast tracks that measured a mile; the viewing stands could seat 17,000 fans. Many famous NASCAR drivers, including Richard Petty and Junior Johnson, raced on the dirt track. The track is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Closed in 1968, the track has recently reopened as a historic walking trail.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Jan 2004, p16-17, il Periodical Website
Record #:
6896
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cruze discusses the Endor iron furnace which was built near Sanford in Lee County in 1862. The furnace went into blast in 1863, producing twenty-one tons of pig iron a day for material used in Confederate munitions. No one can say for certain who the builder was or how the furnace got its name. The stones used in the construction weighed between one and two thousand pounds and were joined without using mortar. Today the top left corner of the furnace remains in its original condition, standing thirty-five feet tall and thirty-two feet wide with an eight foot tall open arch on each side. The furnace was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 1974.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 6, Nov 2004, p27-28, 30-31, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
7031
Author(s):
Abstract:
Laurinburg Institute in Scotland County is the oldest private African American boarding school in the country. Founded with Booker T. Washington's help, the institute celebrated its one hundredth anniversary in September 2004. The school is a quiet learning haven for inner-city youth. Since 1963, graduates who have gone on to receive college degrees total 83 percent.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 37 Issue 2, Feb 2005, p12-14, il Periodical Website
Record #:
7535
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cruze discusses Wake County's only organic farmer and the Eastern Carolina Organics (ECO) program. Fred Miller, a former office equipment salesman, runs Wake County's only certified organic farm, Hilltop Farm. He and his wife own thirty acres on which they grow strawberries, potatoes, bok choy, and roma tomatoes. The Carolina Farm Stewardship Association started ECO to help new organic farmers and organic tobacco farmers grow more produce. Many organic farmers sell at food stands. ECO encourages them to focus on other areas, including natural food stores, co-ops, and restaurants.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 22 Issue 41, Oct 2005, p46-47, 49, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
7571
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cruze describes the search for Fish Dam Road and the discoveries made. The search was a project undertaken by students at the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics and their teacher Joe Liles. The road was once a major thoroughfare, running east and west on a ridge south of the Eno River, between the Neuse River in Durham County and Hillsborough in Orange County. Indians first walked it over 300 years ago, then European settlers moving West, and finally permanent, local residents. By 2003, urban development buried the road, and it was long forgotten until the class brought it back to life.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 37 Issue 8, Aug 2005, p20-21, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
7884
Author(s):
Abstract:
Starting in the coastal plain, the North Carolina Birding Trail will take birdwatchers to natural areas of rural regions throughout the state. Over thirty states have similar trails that generate millions of ecotourism dollars and provide funds to protect vanishing bird habitats. The nation's oldest birding trail was started in Texas in the early 1980s and is almost 2,110 miles long. When completed, North Carolina's trail will have three regional components. The coastal plains loop, the first section, is scheduled to open in the summer of 2006. This trail will be a driving route that connects birdwatching sites. The goal is to have at least one site in each of the state's 100 counties. A trail book will describe each birding area, including species at the site and nearby points of interest.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 38 Issue 4, Apr 2006, p12-13, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8051
Author(s):
Abstract:
Organic farming is the fastest growing segment of agriculture in the nation. In North Carolina the demand of retailers is outrunning production. Sales of organic products are the fastest growing sector in the state's retail food industry. Raft Swamp Farm in Hoke County gives individuals interested in organic farming an opportunity to explore it before investing in land by leasing them one of eight three-acre incubator farms for less than $200 a month. Cruze explains how the program works.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
12298
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thomas and Robert Butler have turned their 108-acre family farm in Harnett County from tobacco to hog raising. To protect the environment and deal with swine waste, the Butlers are promoting a hog waste storage system that benefits the environment by cutting down on greenhouse emissions and transforming animal waste into electricity. This approach has attracted attention from around the nation.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
19277
Author(s):
Abstract:
More than 70 bird species have been seen on the Hoke County farm of Raft Swamp, and they are not there by coincidence. Jackie and Louie Hough have made efforts to attract the birds in order to create a thriving small-scale sustainable farm in the Sandhills of North Carolina.
Full Text:
Record #:
10918
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is home to over 4,000 native flowering plants, and 740 of them are considered rare or significantly rare. A large number of 47 plants is designated threatened. Among these plants are the Appalachian filmy fern, Eastern prairie blue wild indigo, Gray's lily, Georgia aster, Gray's lily, Plymouth gentian, Seabeach amaranth, and Small's portulaca.
Full Text:
Record #:
11453
Author(s):
Abstract:
Torreya taxifolia is a federally endangered conifer. It exists in a narrow range of habitat in Georgia and Florida. The oldest one in the country still stands in Norlina in Warren County and is around 150 years old. In an effort to save the species, an activist group called the Torreya Guardians planted thirty-one seedlings near Waynesville. While it will take years to prove it, the group feels moving the tree northward will improve its chance to produce seeds.
Full Text:
Record #:
20037
Author(s):
Abstract:
A.J. Bullard is a retired dentist. A graduate of the University of North Carolina, he and his family settled on a Duplin County farm; he practiced dentistry in Mt. Olive. Although he has no formal horticultural training, he is recognized as one of the state's preeminent botanists and is known across the Southeast for his expertise in grafting fruit trees.
Full Text:
Record #:
28227
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cricket Rakita and Dr. Lee Barnes of the Carolina Farm Stewardship Association believe that vegetable diversity is under threat. As large seed companies buy up smaller seed companies and patent the seeds or genetically alter them, fewer varieties are being grown. With fewer varities of vegetables grown, certain types of heritage vegetables are lost along with their history. Rakita and Barnes discuss the importance of saving seeds to protect diversity, especially the heritage of the Southeast.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 10, March 2007, pOnline Periodical Website
Record #:
28247
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lionel Vatinet is the owner of La Farm Bakery in Cary, NC and he discusses his history and success. Trained as a Maitre Boulanger (master baker) in Europe, Vatinet has found success in America. Vatinet takes pride in his work and spends much of his time educating others and consulting start-up, in-store, and manufacturing bakeries. Vatinet’s baked goods have been featured on Rachel Ray’s TV show and several of his breads are now carried by Whole Foods in the Triangle area.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 18, May 2007, p41-45 Periodical Website
Record #:
28316
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mike Jones of Franklin County owns a small farm which raises free-range, natural, and humanely raised hogs. Jones began working with confinement hog farms, but says his conscience prevented him staying in that industry. Jones’ biggest challenge is raising enough hogs to make money while keeping them from damaging their environment. Jones also works as an extension specialist for NC A&T University and encourages other farmers to use sustainable farming practices.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 38, September 2007, p28-29 Periodical Website