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17 results for Roads--History
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Record #:
1992
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Travelers in 19th-century Western North Carolina were often impeded by drovers with large, noisy herds of hogs, cattle, ducks, and turkeys on their way to market
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 6, Nov 1994, p13-14, il
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Record #:
4688
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Road building held a low priority in North Carolina until the beginning of the 20th-century. The implementation of Rural Free Delivery (RFD), the North Carolina Good Roads Association, and the affordable Model T Ford made road construction a necessity. During the 1920s, through the efforts of Gov. Cameron Morrison and State Highway Commission Chairman, Frank Page, the state became nationally known for its outstanding highway system.
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Record #:
7571
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Cruze describes the search for Fish Dam Road and the discoveries made. The search was a project undertaken by students at the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics and their teacher Joe Liles. The road was once a major thoroughfare, running east and west on a ridge south of the Eno River, between the Neuse River in Durham County and Hillsborough in Orange County. Indians first walked it over 300 years ago, then European settlers moving West, and finally permanent, local residents. By 2003, urban development buried the road, and it was long forgotten until the class brought it back to life.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 37 Issue 8, Aug 2005, p20-21, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8074
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The Great Philadelphia Wagon Road served as a main north-–south thoroughfare in Colonial America. Prior to English settlement, Iroquois tribes used the road as a trading route. A portion of the Wagon Road can still be found on William H. McGee's farm in Stokes County. As Stokes County Historical Council president, McGee is directing a project to retrace the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road through North Carolina. This project is sponsored by the North Carolina Quadricentennial Anniversary Committee. Along with other projects, such as the building of the Elizabeth II and the excavation of the Lost Colony on Roanoke Island, the North Carolina Quadricentennial Anniversary Committee is attempting to call attention to the first English settlements in America.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 1, June 1984, p17-19, por
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Record #:
8476
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Before the automobile, wagons were the prime mode of local transportation. Wagons built in eastern North Carolina differed from those built in western North Carolina in the width of their track. Owing to the rough terrain, western buggies had a width of only fifty-four inches; those in the east had a width of sixty inches. Buggies that went on roads outside of their region experienced rough rides. This was rarely a problem, however, as few North Carolinians took their buggies far away from home. The automobile changed things. The first mass-produced cars, such as the Ford Model-T, came with a sixty-inch tread option, but by 1916, all cars were manufactured with a fifty-four-inch tread. This caused a lot of damage to roads in eastern North Carolina until the paving campaigns of the 1920s and 1940s.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 2, July 1983, p14, il
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Record #:
8470
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North Carolina has a good road system, but one 100 years ago, traveling in the state was quite different. Then each county, instead of the state, was in charge of its roads. Most roads were unpaved. Few roads connected people to other counties, and even fewer connected to roads outside the state. To go long distances, either in North Carolina or outside of it, people took the train. La Vere recounts the history of road development in the state during the 20th-century and what changes may occur over the next 50 years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 8, Jan 2007, p60-62, 64, 66, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
9963
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The first intercolonial roadway through North Carolina completed in 1727, roughly paralleled U.S. 17. Most of the principal towns and tourist goals which attract north-south travelers along the Coastal Highway today were already stopping places in pre-Revolutionary times.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 7, Dec 1973, p9-11, il, por, map
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Record #:
10015
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Road building held a low priority in North Carolina until the beginning of the 20th-century. The article presents a brief history of the development of the state's road system up to 1943. At that date the highway system covered 60,000 miles of public roads, with about 12,000 miles being hard-surfaced.
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Record #:
14548
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Originally there were the buffalo trails in western North Carolina. Then came the paths made by Indians, and finally the rough roads built by early settlers.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 27, Dec 1945, p26-27, f
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Record #:
20638
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Many of the roads North Carolinians drive on today started centuries before the coming of the colonists. Centuries ago woodlands and meadowlands were thick with deer, buffalo, and other smaller animals that made trails from one feeding ground to another. Later Native Americans would follow these trails. As the colonists began to arrive, these trails gradually widened. Usually they were dirt and in rainy periods could be almost impassable. Plank roads followed some in the mid-1800s, but it would be around 1900 before North Carolina began to take a serious interest in road improvement.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 40, Feb 1946, p10-11, 24-25, il
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Record #:
20742
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The year 1921 is recorded as the year that public sentiment toward turning the highways over to the state changed rather than continuing it as a county-and-town function. Griffin recounts the hard work that went toward bringing the highway system up to its present high standard.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 1, June 1946, p3, 18-20
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Record #:
22138
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Road building held a low priority in North Carolina until the beginning of the 20th-century. At that time the state was not involved. It was left to the counties, and the counties did not work together. Therefore, crossing county lines would often provide a different type of road for drivers. The implementation of Rural Free Delivery (RFD), the North Carolina Good Roads Association, and the affordable Model T Ford made road construction a necessity. During the 1920s, through the efforts of Governors Locke Craig and Cameron Morrison and State Highway Commission Chairman, Frank Page, the state became nationally known for its outstanding highway system.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p42-44, 46, 48-49, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
6206
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Before the 1920s, most of the roads in North Carolina were dirt, and in wet weather, impassable. Enter Harriet Berry, graduate of the State Normal and Industrial College in Greensboro and staff member of the North Carolina State Geological and Economic Survey in 1901 and of the North Carolina Good Roads Association in 1902. She and state geologist Joseph Pratt worked relentlessly for two decades to bring the state good roads. While Pratt went off to war, Berry brought a road bill to the legislature. It was a bitter fight with much opposition, but Berry prevailed. State-funded roads became a reality.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Winter 1984, p15-17, il, por, bibl
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Record #:
7080
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Trains were a major form of travel in the state in the early 20th-century, but by 1921, North Carolinians owned over 136,000 automobiles. The most popular car was the Model-T, because of its reasonable price and reliability. North Carolina dirt roads, however, often impassable in wet weather. Turner discusses the work of Harriet Berry, whose work in the 1920s led to legislation that created all-weather roads in the state. As the decade closed, another type of transportation emerged -- the airplane.
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Record #:
16198
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The earliest system of trails was developed by Native Americans connecting various settlements throughout the territory. Later, European settlers followed these same paths and developed a system of roads based on these and often enlarging them to permit wagons to pass. Traces of these are still visible, like The Carolina Trail between Crooked Creek in Stokes County and South Mayo River in Patrick County, Virginia.
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