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13 results for Transportation--History
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Record #:
1725
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Transportation Museum at Historic Spencer Shops north of Salisbury attracts 80,000 visitors a year. Visitors to the museum can see various types of transportation in static displays and in live operation.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 2, July 1994, p16-18, il
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Record #:
8078
Abstract:
The authors discuss the importance of waterways for transportation in eastern North Carolina during the 17th- and 18th-centuries. At that time it was the only mode of travel to cover any distance in a reasonable amount of time and remained so until railroads replaced them in the early 19th-century. Bridges and ferries were necessities and were sources of income to their operators, and many farmers and manufacturers relied on water travel to get their products to market.
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Record #:
9318
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hoover carts appeared in North Carolina in the early 1930s during the Depression. When a family's Ford or Chevrolet broke and they could not afford to fix it, the car was converted into a two-wheeled cart led by a mule or horse.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 11, Apr 1980, p26
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Record #:
9376
Author(s):
Abstract:
Around 1914 mountain-dwellers in covered-wagon caravans trekked from between Pipers Gap and Low Gap to sell their produce at the markets of Winston-Salem. Often setting up camp at Pole Hollow on their way, the mountain folk brought a foreign way of life to the Piedmont towns below.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 7, Dec 1974, p12-13, il
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Record #:
15066
Abstract:
Transportation in North Carolina has made a long stride from the Indian trails, the old plank roads, and the wood-burning locomotives to modern methods of rail, bus, truck, and airplane traffic.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 24, Nov 1940, p1-2, f
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Record #:
19563
Author(s):
Abstract:
Early colonists attempted to establish roads and highways in eastern North Carolina but inhabitants of the Albemarle region depended largely on the area's natural waterways for transportation. Documentation of colonial transportation avenues is limited but the article outlines the history of travel throughout the region during the early colonial phase. The article expounds on early types of watercraft and the difficulties of travel over land.
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Record #:
22378
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1912 dedication of a bust of Governor Morehead in the Hall of the House of Representatives marked the occasion for this review of the contributions of the governor. As both governor and later promoter of the North Carolina Railroad, Morehead greatly improved transportation and commerce within the state. His far-reaching public programs still affect us today.
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Record #:
7080
Author(s):
Abstract:
Trains were a major form of travel in the state in the early 20th-century, but by 1921, North Carolinians owned over 136,000 automobiles. The most popular car was the Model-T, because of its reasonable price and reliability. North Carolina dirt roads, however, often impassable in wet weather. Turner discusses the work of Harriet Berry, whose work in the 1920s led to legislation that created all-weather roads in the state. As the decade closed, another type of transportation emerged -- the airplane.
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Record #:
7960
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Abstract:
Neal summarizes the advances in transportation in the state. Early settlers arrived after an Atlantic voyage of seventy-five days. Wagons and boats took them farther inland, and later a road system developed. This was followed by the railroads and major highways and finally the airplane. Traveling on the Great Wagon Road from Pennsylvania to Salisbury in Rowan County took 24 days in the 1790s, then 13 hours by rail in the 1940s, 7 hours by car in the Interstate in the 1970s, and finally 4 by plane today.
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Record #:
27363
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Abstract:
The article describes the process of creating a mass transit system within the Triangle area connecting Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, the three major universities, and the airport. The system will run buses on routes through the Triangle area and debate has started over the need or lack thereof for a rail system to connect the Triangle. The article also explores the history of the transit movement, the people who opposed it, and how the system will be paid for through a vehicle registration tax.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 28, July 1991, p6 Periodical Website
Record #:
29935
Abstract:
In the early days, sailing vessels were used to transport goods from the mainland to the villages on the Outer Banks. Using two-masted vessels, crew would sail to Elizabeth City for food, supplies, building materials, and coal.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p22-23, por
Record #:
31423
Author(s):
Abstract:
Spencer Shops State Historic Site, near Salisbury, is the former location of the largest Southern railway facility between Washington and Atlanta. The new exhibit, “People, Places and Times,” covers transportation history in North Carolina, from a prehistoric Indian canoe to a modern day airplane. This article discusses the history of the Southern Railway, and some of the features in the museum exhibit.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 10, Oct 1983, p18-19, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34473
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is a segment of an oral history with Alton Taylor, who recalls taking agricultural produce to Virginia in his father’s sharpie. Vessel dimensions are given, along with details of the trip.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p8