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18 results for Depressions--1929
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Record #:
9318
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hoover carts appeared in North Carolina in the early 1930s during the Depression. When a family's Ford or Chevrolet broke and they could not afford to fix it, the car was converted into a two-wheeled cart led by a mule or horse.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 11, Apr 1980, p26
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Record #:
11511
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this continuing series of articles on the various departments of North Carolina state government, Waynick discusses the workings of the Public Works Administration and Reemployment Office as it affects North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 40, Mar 1934, p11, 20, por
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
17096
Author(s):
Abstract:
Not many people would start a company in the midst of the Great Depression, but H. D. Horton of Charlotte did. In 1930 he organized a trucking company--Horton Motor Lines. Today, the company has over 350 trucks on the road, operates over 600,000 miles a month, and serves through its sixteen terminals 35,000 customers in ten states on the Eastern seaboard.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 40, Mar 1938, p9, 18, il, por
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Record #:
17361
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1935, the General Assembly passed three new laws to expedite the distribution of Federal Relief Funds. The three measures were; Emergency Municipal Bond Act of 1935, Emergency County Bond Act of 1935, and The Revenue Bond Act of 1935. Each of these laws streamlines the approval of bonds for approved Public Works Administration projects on a local and county-wide level.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 2 Issue 8, July/Aug 1935, p5-6, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
17358
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Depression greatly affected funding for the State's schools because of ten million dollar reduction in expenditure during those trying economic times. In 1935, education advocates Like Clyde Erwin, State Superintendent for Public Schools, prompted state officials to put revenue back into the public education system.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 2 Issue 6, Apr 1935, p6-7, 18, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
17359
Author(s):
Abstract:
The PWA, Public Works Administration, realized great success in the state and proved to be one of the more successful for the entire South. Funds were allocated to both Federal and non-Federal projects within the state. Statistics are presented and which statewide projects came to fruition through this Depression-era initiative.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 2 Issue 6, Apr 1935, p8-9, 19, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
17362
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Branch of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration was established in 1932 and Fred W. Morrison was appointed State Director of Relief. Mr. Cutter outlines the responsibilities of the organization, its structure throughout the state, and types of aid distributed to the State's citizens.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 2 Issue 8, July/Aug 1935, p10-12, 15, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
16214
Abstract:
The Works Progress Administration (WPA), a New Deal agency, employed 125,000 of the state's men and women. These people of all races completed 3,984 jobs across the state between 1935 and 1940. A variety of projects were completed from construction of new facilities and records made of rural folk artists.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
16212
Author(s):
Abstract:
President Franklin Delano Roosevelt developed the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) as part of his New Deal plan to aid young men during the Great Depression. CCC camps were not predetermined to be segregated but poor race relations in the south made it necessary separate African American and white workers. In North Carolina between 1933 and 1942, eleven African American CCC camps functioned across the state and performed tasks building roads, clearing forests, and planting vegetation to lessen soil erosion.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
35751
Author(s):
Abstract:
References to Hoover revealed time (the Great Depression). Details such as the favorite pastime of the main character’s father (cockfighting) betrayed the setting (a family farm in a small town). These details make the story, dedicated to Erskine Caldwell, seem unrelatable for modern, urban audiences. The conflict between the main character’s parents on how to assure that he (Wesley) becomes a decent adult, however, may be perceived as a timeless issue.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p25-26, 37, 55
Record #:
35778
Author(s):
Abstract:
An encounter on a train with a stranger left him the owner of a coat seemingly tailored for him and a pocketful of dollars that seemed like pennies from heaven. From that meeting and gifts, Owen was taught this lesson: the best gifts aren’t always wrapped up in a box and bow.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p31-32, 56
Record #:
36004
Author(s):
Abstract:
Old time crabbing meant trot lines instead of wire pots, and income of three cents a pound versus the contemporary rate of twelve. From Edward Scarborough’s observations about facts like these, one ironic conclusion could be drawn. A better living could be made in the midst of the Great Depression than forty years later.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p18-21
Record #:
35935
Author(s):
Abstract:
WWII reached Hatteras Island courtesy of spies, as accompanied photos of the houses they stayed in attested. Among spy reports famous enough for film was of a man many Islanders may have never assumed could be among the enemy. Hans Hoff, the spy whose electrocution was filmed, had lived with one of the local families one summer in the early 1930s.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p64-69
Record #:
35961
Abstract:
Vats that kept horses and cattle clean and tick free were first provided during the Great Depression. Stories that attested to the importance of the vats came from Buxton natives attesting to vats in towns like Waves, Avon, and Rodanthe. Buxton. Included were descriptions of the vats and pictures of vats in Avon.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p53-57
Record #:
36006
Abstract:
Built in Morehead City during the Great Depression, it was the first ferry to run on Hatteras Island. With its important role, the Hadeco became more than a form of human transport or mail delivery. It helped to define a way of life for decades to come.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p26-28