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6 results for Outer Banks--Economic conditions
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Record #:
1477
Author(s):
Abstract:
Spring on the Outer Banks means the beginning of another tourist season. Six million tourists visit the Outer Banks each year, and their economic impact in 1993 was $550 million.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Mar 1994, p26-31, il
Record #:
25081
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charter boat fishing is a top tourist activity along the Outer Banks. A new Fishery Resource Grant study is looking to see what the economic impact of charter boat fishing is on the Outer Banks and surrounding areas.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Summer 2010, p6-11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31645
Author(s):
Abstract:
Buxton, the largest town on the island with about seven-hundred residents, hosts thousands of visitors each year to the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. There is also the United States Weather Station, a Naval facility, and a Coast Guard station at Buxton. With an increasing number of visitors, tourism has replaced commercial fishing as the major private industry.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 8, Aug 1975, p6-8, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35578
Author(s):
Abstract:
Albemarle, in addition to being the name of a major waterway, comprises ten counties of the Coastal Region. How it contributed more than a name was expressed in agricultural income, as well as the Currituck Plan designed to improve the underdeveloped Outer Banks.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Aug/Sept 1973, p24
Record #:
35925
Author(s):
Abstract:
Good weather, necessary for tourism, the Outer Banks’ major income source. Always looming, though, was the possibility of bad weather dampening the trade. Hence, they were dependent upon good weather and vulnerable when it wasn’t: lessons natives learned early in life. Fortunately, they had the wisdom of past generations’ experience to serve as a guide.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p14-15
Record #:
35961
Abstract:
Vats that kept horses and cattle clean and tick free were first provided during the Great Depression. Stories that attested to the importance of the vats came from Buxton natives attesting to vats in towns like Waves, Avon, and Rodanthe. Buxton. Included were descriptions of the vats and pictures of vats in Avon.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p53-57