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Record #:
23714
Author(s):
Abstract:
“The Dipping Vat War” There had always been a problem with “Cattle Ticks” making cows sickly and puny on NC farms. After WWI experiments were done to combat cattle ticks by building cement vats and bathing cows in a poison arsenic mixture several times. It appeared to work and the cows grew fat and started producing milk again. But there were those around Pitt County who refused to be ordered by the government to have their cattle dipped. Unknown parties blew up government vats with dynamite, threatened other farmers, and shot at vat workers. In 1920 the Pitt County Commissioners authorized the vat campaign to be shut down for the safety for everyone; but were well pleased with dipping campaign as a whole and Pitt County was taken off the North Carolina tick quarantine list.
Record #:
30154
Author(s):
Abstract:
The trend in livestock has added a permanent rejuvenation to farms in North Carolina. But not only do cows, which required green pastures, provide surface improvement, they are also putting money into North Carolina farmers' pockets. Increase in the value of cattle over the last decade has been due to an increase in the population, better breeds, scientific management, and healthy animals.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 9 Issue 3, July 1951, p10-13, 27, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
31602
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fletch Pope of Catawba County is a hunter, farmer, cattleman and raconteur who recently developed an interest in buffalo. As the nation begins considering the cattle and bison as an alternate meat source, Fletch researched ways to create a “beefalo.” After multiple attempts, Fletch produced a hybrid animal mixed with a cow and a buffalo.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
35961
Abstract:
Vats that kept horses and cattle clean and tick free were first provided during the Great Depression. Stories that attested to the importance of the vats came from Buxton natives attesting to vats in towns like Waves, Avon, and Rodanthe. Buxton. Included were descriptions of the vats and pictures of vats in Avon.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p53-57