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11 results for Ferries--North Carolina
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Record #:
13156
Author(s):
Abstract:
Comprising nine lines and carrying approximately 327,586 passengers annually, the North Carolina ferry system uses a combination of old and new vessels to transport people and cars across state waters.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 1, June 1954, p15-16, il
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Record #:
19091
Abstract:
Although water is a natural part of what draws people to the coastal setting, it can also present difficulties to travel. In a two-part series, this issue focuses on some of the problems with coastal transportation, and the discussion of means of travel through ferries and bridges.
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Record #:
19092
Abstract:
Chances are, few inland residents realize that North Carolina has its own ferry fleet, but people at areas such as Hatteras and Ocracoke are well aware of the vital link the ferry system provides in North Carolina coastal transportation.
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Record #:
19558
Author(s):
Abstract:
The ferry crews on the Bayview-Aurora ferry route consider passenger safety their number one priority during a passage. Even while dealing with safety, security, and ferry maintenance, they still find time to enjoy the little things like the beautiful North Carolina sunset.
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Record #:
24558
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Elwell Ferry is one of the last inland river ferries in North Carolina and is located between state highways 53 and 87 in Bladen County and crosses the Cape Fear River. The history of the ferry is presented in this article.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 16, January 1972, p6-7, il
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Record #:
31434
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ferry service on the Cape Fear River, connecting Southport and Fort Fisher, was inaugurated in February by the North Carolina State Highway Commission. The ferry substitutes for the 51 mile drive between Fort Fisher on the southeastern coast and Southport. The ferry can also be used in combination with the state and federal highways for a loop trip touching points of interest.
Record #:
31700
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tideland is the coastal area of eastern North Carolina consisting of creeks, rivers, and sounds. The North Carolina State Highway Commission’s Ferry Service operates four ferries crossing the Pamlico River, the Neuse River, Hatteras Inlet, and Cedar Island to Ocracoke. This article describes the state’s transportation system and typical ferry operation.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 9, Sept 1973, p9, il, por
Record #:
36010
Author(s):
Abstract:
Called the gateway to Hatteras Island, the bridge built in the 1960s and named after Senator Herbert Bonner was experiencing the wear and tear of commuting use. Limitations on its daily use were imposed during its repair period. Such an occasion made Island residents all the more aware of the bridge’s importance in their way of life.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p46-47
Record #:
36006
Abstract:
Built in Morehead City during the Great Depression, it was the first ferry to run on Hatteras Island. With its important role, the Hadeco became more than a form of human transport or mail delivery. It helped to define a way of life for decades to come.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p26-28
Record #:
36029
Author(s):
Abstract:
Glimpses of the past were perhaps seen most clearly in this collection of photos. One was a reminder of when the ferry was the only source of transport for humans and cargo. Others were reminders of businesses long since gone out of business, as well as buildings still standing. Most the photos, though, attested the importance of waterways around the Island, whether the creek familiarly known as the “Slash,” Core Sound, or Atlantic Ocean.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p30-39
Record #:
36167
Abstract:
The connection between a well known area of the Outer Banks and Beaufort County's capital was created physically. For many decades, ferries like the Bessie Virginia transported good between “Little Washington” and area known for its connection to Roanoke’s lost colony. It was also created emotionally, in the bonds between people interdependent on each other for survival.