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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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27 results for World War (1939-1945)
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Record #:
25493
Author(s):
Abstract:
Konrad Jarausch is a UNC professor in the Department of History and the son of a German World War II officer. Jarausch never met his father but finally faced his legacy 60 years later. His father’s wartime letters revealed the emotional realities, values and obligations soldiers faced in the war.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 28 Issue 1, Fall 2011, p16-19, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26175
Author(s):
Abstract:
As part of her honors thesis in Asian studies, Carolyn Berndt translated the story of one of the Japanese Army’s comfort women during World War Two. Comfort women were recruited or kidnapped to provide sex for Japanese soldiers.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Jan 1997, p8-9, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28075
Author(s):
Abstract:
First Presbyterian Church of New Bern provided a home away from home for servicemen during World War Two. Sazie Marriner was the woman chosen as hostess to oversee the center.
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Record #:
29136
Abstract:
World War II’s the Battle of the Bulge, also known as the Ardennes Campaign, is detailed in three sections. The first section covers the stalemate between German and Allied troops in the autumn and early winter of 1944. The second section covers the background, strategy of the German troops, and the loss of life in Battle of the Bulge from December 16-26, 1944. The final section specifically looks at the 30th Infantry Division’s participation in the battle.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 6 Issue 1, May 2000, p1-3
Record #:
29141
Author(s):
Abstract:
Frank Warnock tells the story of his experience in the 117th Infantry as part of the 30th Infantry Division at Stavelot, Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge during World War II. Warnock describes how the regiment was enjoying a period of rest before being called into action. He tells of joining the battle, saving a group of civilians, taking German soldiers prisoner, the massacre of a group of civilians by the German SS, and the 117th’s movements after the battle.
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Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 6 Issue 1, May 2000, p6-7
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Record #:
29140
Author(s):
Abstract:
A story from a solider describes how his American 823d Tank Destroyer Battalion destroyed a German Tiger II tank numbered 222 during the Battle of the Bulge.
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Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 6 Issue 1, May 2000, p3-4
Subject(s):
Record #:
31404
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many North Carolinians are concerned that proposals for granting offshore oil-drilling leases could lead to oil spills. During World War Two, oil spills along North Carolina’s shoreline were common since oil tankers were main targets by the German Navy U-boats. In the process, many tankers sank, leaving grave markers along the coast.
Record #:
34600
Abstract:
Following the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, Ethel Phillips traveled west to work at the Los Angeles Times covering the war. In 1943, Phillips joined the Marine Corps as an office administrator. This article details some of her experiences during the war and her eventual residency in Carteret County.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Summer 1999, p14-16, il, por
Record #:
34844
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1940, the Marine Corps began searching for the perfect spot to build a new base in which soldiers could train for amphibious assault missions. This was first called Marine Barracks New River; it was later renamed after General Lejeune, who revolutionized the way that Marines trained for amphibious assault missions.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 86 Issue 7, December 2018, p184-190, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35635
Author(s):
Abstract:
The title, echoing a shout by her fellow schoolchildren, hinted at the poverty stricken circumstances revealed in her clothes. Christmas Day, though, was an occasion to forget all she lacked, because of presents given by relatives in California. The present most cherished was a copy of Louisa May Alcott, Little Women; she could relate all too well to its main characters, the Marsh family.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 6, Dec 1977, p8-10, 18
Record #:
35783
Author(s):
Abstract:
This restaurant, started by a father and son, has changed hands twice since its opening during WWII. Remaining constant is offering fisherman their first catch of the early day in a hearty breakfast. As for what has become true over the years, that was offering this first catch of the day to all, and in the process, making the restaurant a hang-out for natives and visitors alike.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p7S-8S
Record #:
36990
Abstract:
Among the 1,100 cameras in Ken Toda’s Huemax are 1940s reporter cameras, 1920s’ portrait photographer cameras, and 1880s wet-plate cameras. Toda, who assists collectors and hobbyists worldwide, helps to upkeep High Point’s role in developing photography as a medium.
Record #:
35760
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author reflected on the value that wood stoves, existing before the widespread adoption of electricity Down East during the 1940s, had for the region’s people. Leggett offered illustrations such as the better tastes of wood stove cooked foods, stories featuring family members like the author’s mother, and the important role these stoves played during holidays such as Christmas.
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Record #:
35935
Author(s):
Abstract:
WWII reached Hatteras Island courtesy of spies, as accompanied photos of the houses they stayed in attested. Among spy reports famous enough for film was of a man many Islanders may have never assumed could be among the enemy. Hans Hoff, the spy whose electrocution was filmed, had lived with one of the local families one summer in the early 1930s.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p64-69
Record #:
35954
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remembrance of rescue from a Coast Guard boat overtaken by a hurricane was spurred by the death of Lt. Bernice Ramon Ballance. He, as much as the event, was a reminder that heroes, found during war and peace, can be located on a rescuing sea plane as much as capsized cutter. For more information about this event, refer to the book, North Carolina Hurricanes, by Charles B. Carney and Albert V. Hardy.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p59-64