NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


589 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 40
Next
Record #:
58
Abstract:
Zug profiles the Parnells, a family of rug makers in Davidson County.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Fall 1991, p32-37, il, por
Record #:
57
Abstract:
Patterson describes the art work found on gravestones.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Fall 1991, p26-31, il
Record #:
61
Abstract:
The authors present the government's official definition of \"folklife\", and introduce various aspects of the study of folklife.
Source:
Record #:
59
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hinson recounts the Menhaden fishing expeditions along the coast as well as the renowned chanteys sung by the fishermen.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Fall 1991, p18-23, il
Record #:
60
Author(s):
Abstract:
Luster introduces the African-American chanteymen of the Menhaden fish pulls.
Source:
Record #:
62
Author(s):
Abstract:
Moser recounts North Carolina Native American myths.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Fall 1991, p3-8, il, por
Record #:
1616
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mary Hilliard Hinton was the leader of North Carolina's anti-suffrage movement. The movement was successful in the state, but the Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution was eventually ratified, thereby undermining this success.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 33 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p23-27, il, por
Record #:
1614
Abstract:
Women, including Raleigh's Mollie Huston Lee, have played an important role in the growth and promotion of libraries and reading in North Carolina.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 33 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p28-31, il, por
Record #:
1619
Abstract:
Nellie Rowe was librarian of the Greensboro Public Library for almost thirty years. Rowe was active in the state and national library associations and served as president of the North Carolina Library Association for two years.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 33 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p30, il, por
Record #:
1618
Abstract:
Valeria Lynch Lee, a native of Hollister in Halifax County, is the moderator for the University of North Carolina Center for Public Television's Black Issues Forum, a member of the University of NC Board of Governors, and an advocate of philanthropy.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
1613
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gertrude Weil, member of a wealthy Goldsboro family, was president of North Carolina's Equal Suffrage League in 1920.
Source:
Record #:
1617
Author(s):
Abstract:
Economic opportunity for women in North Carolina has historically been dismal. This status has been changing for some time, however, and women have more opportunities now than ever before.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
1620
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolinians engaged in heated debate over the proposed Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) that would have given women the same rights as men. North Carolina legislators voted against ratification of the amendment six times from 1973 to1982.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 33 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p32-37, il, por
Record #:
1631
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1972 the grave of a Native American woman was unearthed in Stokes County by anthropologists from UNC-Chapel Hill. Later, using forensic reconstruction, the Office of State Archaeology and the NC Museum of History re-created the woman's appearance.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 33 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p5-10, il, por
Record #:
2008
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1900 and 1960 the automobile significantly changed recreation in North Carolina by making travel cheaper and easier, recreation sites more accessible, and support businesses, such as gift shops and restaurants, more widespread.
Source: