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14 results for Fishing nets
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Record #:
59
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hinson recounts the Menhaden fishing expeditions along the coast as well as the renowned chanteys sung by the fishermen.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Fall 1991, p18-23, il
Record #:
188
Author(s):
Abstract:
The chanteys of the North Carolina menhaden fishermen, who worked the North Carolina coast in the 19th and 20th centuries, are reminiscent of old field-work songs and gospel songs, and their lyrics reflect the work, religion and loves of the men.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 10, Mar 1992, p25-26, por
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Record #:
4551
Author(s):
Abstract:
Netmaking is as old as fishing. It is a specialized craft that is slowly fading away, with only six full-time net shops left in the state, and fewer still in Georgia and South Carolina. One reason for the decline is the increase in federal and state regulations governing commercial fishermen. North Carolina has requirements on the use of particular nets, including fixed, gill, trawl, and channel.
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Record #:
4783
Abstract:
In 1994, the North Carolina General Assembly established the Fishery Resource Grant program, which funds projects that test ways to preserve coastal resources. Dave Beresoff's project seeks ways to prevent sharks from getting tangled in commercial gill nets.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2000, p20-22, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
7567
Abstract:
Austin discusses the fundamentals of net tying. He fished with his brothers from 1925 until he went off to World War II. When more net was needed when fishing, he got the equipment and materials and tied on more net. Austin illustrates fifteen steps in how to tie a fishing net.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p38-43, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
8827
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remnants of the pound net, originally used by Croatan Indians and depicted in John White's drawings, can still be seen in North Carolina rivers of today. The pound nets of today are more sophisticated, but still lead fish into a trap and hold them there. A full size net is on display at the North Carolina Marine Resources Center on Roanoke Island.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 12, May 1981, p22-23, il
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Record #:
14696
Author(s):
Abstract:
Captain James W. Willis (1844-1920) was a whaling captain and fisherman who fished out of Morehead City, Carteret County. After years of fishing with baited lines, he developed the idea of sinking a net to increase fish catches and eliminate the need for fishing line. Though undated, his first experiment involved bricks tied to a net. The contraption, now known as a sink net, was sunk and left for an hour. Afterwards Willis and his crew hauled in 2,000 pounds of fish, quadrupling a typically successful day of fishing with hand lines.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 52, May 1947, p5, il
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Record #:
25012
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sea turtles get caught in fishermen’s nets all the time. However, a new device is being designed to fit onto a fisherman’s net that will sort out any heavy objects, such as a sea turtle, and push it through a trap door in the bottom of the net. This is expected to save many turtles from being trapped and killed by the nets.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 8 Issue 5, May 1981, p5-6, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
25048
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pound net fishing is a form of fishing that is slowly disappearing. While it used to be the most popular form of fishing, it has seen a decline in the last few years. Several pound net fishermen share their stories.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2002, p16-19, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
25120
Author(s):
Abstract:
Derelict fishing gear poses a problem to the coast in many ways. A new program is now underway to help remove the gear from the shores and prevent any future buildup problems.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2014, p16-21, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
10151
Author(s):
Abstract:
Earley describes a way of fishing along North Carolina's coasts that is slowly disappearing--long-haul net fishing. The technique is expensive and labor intensive and requires coordination among the boats involved. In the 1970s and 1980s, around a dozen long-haul crews worked Core Sound, but it 2007, the number has been reduced to two crews.
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Record #:
29921
Author(s):
Abstract:
Making trawls nets is an art form, and Matthew Salter of Alliance, North Carolina has been practicing it for 37 years. With specialized needles and templates, Salter makes nets of all sizes and shapes for local fisherman that travel all over the country.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p48-53, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
35955
Author(s):
Abstract:
The harvest of the sea one could see in fish captured in nets, also captured on film by the Sea Chest’s staff. It was possible because of the area’s boats, six of which were also featured in film.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p65-69
Record #:
36015
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between the Coast Guard, naval yard, and commercial fisheries work of many kinds, Mr. Robert Watson Gray had gained almost a lifetime of maritime experience. After retirement, with much of his days taken up by fishing, he showed how the lure of the open sea still reeled him in.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p52-59