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17 results for Fishing--North Carolina, Eastern
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Record #:
11935
Author(s):
Abstract:
Found off the coast of North Carolina, the feared barracuda generally haunt the wreckage of ships. Many of the wrecks are old blockade runners sunk during the War Between the States, others more recent wrecks, such as the petroleum tanker Esso Nashville, sunk by a German U-boat during World War II. Sports fishermen enjoy the aggressive, energetic movements of the barracuda as they skip bait across the water, catching specimens at times weighing more than forty pounds.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 3, July 1958, p8-9, 16, por
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Record #:
12179
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thirty years ago, fishing was good in North Carolina, but the catch was small sized and no foundation existed for a sport fishery capable of attracting sportsmen from other areas. A few dreamers speculated on the possibilities of sport fishing far off-shore. Late in the 1920s a few adventurous souls pushed beyond the eastern horizons in small commercial fishing boats, catching large sailfish and other species, eventually proving that North Carolina is a haven for sport fishermen.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 6, Aug 1958, p7-9, por
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Record #:
12642
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although many were convinced sport fishing in North Carolina was futile, others persisted, encouraging a growing number of charter boatmen. By 1946, there were approximately 20 cruisers designated for offshore fishing working out of North Carolina ports. Their persistence paid off in 1953 when 13 blue marlin were caught in Hatteras waters.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 7, Sept 1958, p12, 16, por
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Record #:
12672
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina boasts the largest sport-fishing fleet on the eastern coast operated by one man, Ottis Purifoy. Purifoy's \"Lucky Seven,\"operated out of Morehead City, is comprised now of nine boats with another currently being built. In addition to providing boats and guides, Purifoy has a fish house where he can clean and ice the catch, providing an outlet for his commercial fishing business as well.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 5, Aug 1961, p36, por
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Record #:
12813
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Abstract:
Addressing charter fishing ventures in North Carolina and their slow decline, Old Trudge highlights the decline is fish availability, the most sought after specimens, as well as record breaking catches. Hugo Rutherford, Dr. J. C. Overby, Mrs. Ross Walker, and a few others are mentioned for their roles in the history pertaining to fishing in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 10, Oct 1960, p12-13, il
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Record #:
13669
Author(s):
Abstract:
A record, kept by C.W. Stevens at Morehead City, has taken a lot of the guess work out of estimates of the extent of sport fishing in the Cape Lookout area. According to this count, 81,748 large game fish were landed in the five months ending October 28 by fishermen aboard boats docked at Morehead.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 27, Dec 1951, p14-15, f
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Record #:
14082
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Abstract:
The article focuses on recreational fishing in North Carolina and its impact on the local economy. Visitors coming to fish the waters of North Carolina contribute not only to the industry of recreational fishing but also support local community shops, grocers, and restaurants. Sharpe tries to quantify the profits of recreational fishing for eastern North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 4, June 1948, p3-4, 17, il
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Record #:
24527
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Abstract:
The author recounts his experiences fishing off the coast in North Carolina as a child. The most popular areas included Morehead City, Hatteras, and the Wilmington area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 4, September 1977, p29-31, il
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Record #:
24539
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Abstract:
The author highlights some of the popular fishing spots on North Carolina’s coast and discusses the fishing industry in the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 9, February 1976, p13-14, il
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Record #:
24609
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Abstract:
The shad is North Carolina’s state historical boat and its history dates back to the Reconstruction era. George Washington Creef built the first shad in 1881 and it became a popular boat for those who fished for a living.
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Record #:
24647
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The author highlights some of the popular fishing spots on the North Carolina coast and discusses when various seasons begin.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 22, April 1959, p11-12, il
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Record #:
24711
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The author discusses the beginning of the fishing year on the coast of North Carolina, highlighting the importance of the industry to the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 41, March 1952, p3-5, il
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Record #:
24732
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Abstract:
When pulled quickly from deep depths, many fish experience barotrauma. Symptoms of barotrauma include bulging eyes and internal organs protruding from external parts of the body. Sea Grant specialists and charter boat captains teamed up to develop techniques and technology to increase the survival numbers of catch and release fish that experience barotrauma.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2015, p6-11, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
1197
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Abstract:
Fall fishing is particularly satisfying in the streams, lakes, and impoundments of the Coastal Plain of North Carolina.
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Record #:
28768
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Bluegill, pumpkinseed, and other panfish frequently bite using homemade flies. The author and his friend Ken Bicknell discuss fishing for panfish in the coastal creeks in coastal North Carolina. Tips and stories about fishing are told.