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30 results for Lee, E-Ching
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Record #:
8345
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Elaine Logothetis, a Wilmington-based biologist, leads a project to tag mature female blue crabs in the ocean to track their movements and determine migratory patterns. The project is supported by the North Carolina Sea Grant Blue Crab Research Program. Tags are bright pink. Each contains a phone number or mailing address to report the capture date, location, and fishing method. In 2005, around 1,250 female crabs were tagged and released in the waters off Caswell and Holden beaches, as well as the Long Beach part of Oak Island. Almost half the tags were returned. Most crabs were recaptured within ten miles of the release point, although some made it as far as Myrtle Beach, SC. Among the findings from the 2005 release were that the crabs moved south and southwest; none ever traveled north of the Cape Fear River; and crabs returned to the nearest estuaries as they moved south.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2006, p18-21, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
8533
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The Blue Crab Research Project, funded by the North Carolina General Assembly and administered by the North Carolina Sea Grant Program, is testing the effectiveness of different sizes of cull rings for crab pots along seven of the state's estuaries. Cull rings, or escape rings, allow undersized crabs to escape from the crab pot. Fewer sub-legal crabs in the pots means crabbers spend less time sorting their catches. Results of the study will be available in the summer of 2007.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2007, p24-26, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8796
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Sea turtles emerged around 110 million years ago. At their peak there were four families of them, each with several dozen species. Today, only two families survive. Amanda Southwood, a sea turtle researcher at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, received a North Carolina Fishery Resource Grant in 2006 to study sea turtle movements. The turtles studied are those that have become entangled in fishing nets in the lower Cape Fear River then released. Without satellite and high-frequency tags to track the turtles, there is no way to know if the released animal survived or not.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2007, p20-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8795
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The National Marine Fisheries Service permanently closed Pamlico Sound's deep-water area to large gill net commercial fishing from September to mid-December 2002. The closing was because of sea turtle strandings and their interaction with gill nets. The closing was also detrimental to Hyde County fishermen. A North Carolina Fishery Resource Grant study examines Hyde County fishermen's use of experimental nets that are designed to produce a good flounder catch but avoid or reduce sea turtle entanglements.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2007, p16-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9006
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Sneads Ferry is the top producer of black sea bass in the South Atlantic. Lee reports on a North Carolina Fishery Resource Grant project that seeks to study the efficiency and effectiveness of different configurations of black sea bass pots. The project has three main tasks: to determine if a certain pot type catches more legal sea bass; discover if a particular pot type catches more undersized sea bass; and compare the health of the released sub-legal sea bass from each pot type. The study is being conducted in Onslow Bay.
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Record #:
9009
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Since the early 1900s, North Carolina's native eastern oyster has declined 90 percent. Lee reports on the North Carolina Oyster Hatchery's Program plan to restore oysters in the state.
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Record #:
16046
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Coastal North Carolina draws many visitors and creates a need to accommodate tourists while respecting wishes of permanent residents. Students from East Carolina University's Center for Sustainable Tourism recently sent a survey to families in Brunswick, Currituck, and Pender counties in an effort to understand how resident define their property and gather their reactions to tourism.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2012, p12-16, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
16842
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NC Sea Grant has selected twelve projects to fund for its 2012 to 2014 period. These include studies on oysters, flounder, water runoff, and sustainable coastal development. Lee provides a summary of the projects.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2012, p24-26, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17342
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Sea Grant fisheries specialists tested electronic video equipment in the snapper grouper fishery. Lee discovers what they found and how that might help data gathering in the South Atlantic region.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2012, p16-19, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
17724
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North Carolina scientists are seeking to determine mercury levels in fish commonly caught and consumed in North Carolina, helping to make information for fishermen, retailers, and consumers more accurate.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2012, p18-23, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
18262
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A problem facing shrimpers when the nets are pulled in is bycatch, or unintended catch. Once the shrimp are brought onboard, shrimpers have to sort through them, and having bycatch, which has to be returned to the ocean, slows down the process. Lee reports on the research of John Broome, a Wilmington-based shrimpers, to create new gear that would allow shrimp to be culled faster and return bycatch to the water faster.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2012, p13-16, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
18263
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Lee reports on the research findings of a new turtle excluder device for the state's summer flounder offshore fishery. There are many protected turtles in the area and trawlers want to avoid interaction with them.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2012, p16-17, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20147
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With programs like Research Educator Exchange Forum (REEF) and Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence SouthEast (COSEE SE), ocean and water scientists in North Carolina are reaching out to more schools and audiences to provide marine science education.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2013, p21-26, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
21798
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Lee talks with two oyster growers about their aquaculture operations. Joey Daniels operates the Bodie Island Oysters aquaculture operation for the Wanchese Fish Company. Over the past two years he has built it into one of the largest producers in the state. Chris Matteo operates Chadwick Creek Oysters, at Bayboro in Pamlico County.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2014, p14-19, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
23916
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March 3, 2015 was the 100-year anniversary of the creation of the North Carolina State Park System. To celebrate, the author suggests a number of coastal state parks as summer vacation spots.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2015, p14-19, il, por, map Periodical Website
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