NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for Oyster culture
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4423
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the start of the 20th-century, over a million bushels of oysters were harvested annually in the state. Pollution, over-harvesting, and silty runoffs from coastal construction reduced harvests to 55,000 bushels yearly in the 1990s. Jim and Bonnie Swartzenburg are among a number of oysters farmers seeking to restore the state's oyster culture.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 32 Issue 1, Jan 2000, p20-21, il
Record #:
21798
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lee talks with two oyster growers about their aquaculture operations. Joey Daniels operates the Bodie Island Oysters aquaculture operation for the Wanchese Fish Company. Over the past two years he has built it into one of the largest producers in the state. Chris Matteo operates Chadwick Creek Oysters, at Bayboro in Pamlico County.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2014, p14-19, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
24270
Author(s):
Abstract:
Oyster season in eastern North Carolina runs from October 15 through March 31. People who harvest the oysters are called oystermen and they follow a specific process and use similar equipment no matter if they are harvesting commercially or independently. This article details this process and highlights the health benefits of oysters for humans.
Source:
Record #:
6842
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before pollution and overharvesting all but wiped out the state's oysters, commercial oyster harvesters brought in almost one million bushels a year. Now the harvest is less than 50,000 bushels. Loss of oysters is not only a problem for seafood lovers. It also means a loss of cleaner waters, for oysters filter water for their food. New legislation passed in 2004 now allows dock owners to cultivate their own oysters for consumption. The Under the Dock Oyster Bill states that \"shellfish cultivation provides increased ecological benefits to the estuarine environment by promoting natural water filtration and increased fishery habitats.\"
Full Text:
Record #:
34476
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is a segment of an oral history with Alton Taylor, who recalls catching oysters for sale. Descriptions of his family’s boat and oystering locations are also included.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Summer 1992, p9, il, por
Record #:
34477
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article describes vernacular oyster dredge manufacture by Mr. Closs Harvey on the Outer Banks in the 1930s. Dredges were made of steel rods joined with a hand-cranked forge. Images of the dredges are included.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Summer 1992, p10, il, por