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25 results for Marsh, Mike
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Record #:
4743
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The North Carolina Wildlife Commission's three-year experimental teal season concludes September 7-16, 2000. Bag limit is four teal per hunter per day. Whether the teal season becomes permanent depends upon hunter response. Some feel September is too early for waterfowl hunting. Continuation also depends on whether or not state guidelines for accidental and illegal harvest of other ducks are followed.
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11036
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Eagles Island lies on the border of New Hanover and Brunswick between the Cape Fear and Brunswick rivers. Lying adjacent to Wilmington, the island was a prime spot for developers. Marsh discusses the work of a grassroots group - the Coalition for the Preservation of Eagles Island - that took on the task of protecting the island from development.
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Record #:
11755
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Over the past forty years, the North Carolina Wildlife Commission has assembled a set of data on the state's black bear population. This led to the creation of the Black Bear Cooperator Program - a program of management activities that aided in the growth of the bear populations in eastern and western North Carolina.
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Record #:
5322
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The black drum, the largest member of the croaker family, is a feisty game fish that provides plenty of fight for fishermen along the Carolina coast. Many states regulate size and creel limits to protect the fish, but black drum fishing in North Carolina is unregulated. The largest black drum ever caught in state waters weighed 100 pounds and 1-ounce and was caught in the Cape Fear River in 1998.
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Record #:
6273
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The Howell Woods Environmental Learning Center covers 2,800 acres of Neuse River bottomland in Johnston County. The property is managed by the Johnston County Community College with \"the goal of maintaining it in a natural state while providing educational and recreational opportunities.\" Howell Woods has several different types of habitats, including freshwater wetlands and hardwood forests.
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Record #:
6842
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Before pollution and overharvesting all but wiped out the state's oysters, commercial oyster harvesters brought in almost one million bushels a year. Now the harvest is less than 50,000 bushels. Loss of oysters is not only a problem for seafood lovers. It also means a loss of cleaner waters, for oysters filter water for their food. New legislation passed in 2004 now allows dock owners to cultivate their own oysters for consumption. The Under the Dock Oyster Bill states that \"shellfish cultivation provides increased ecological benefits to the estuarine environment by promoting natural water filtration and increased fishery habitats.\"
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Record #:
6771
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Some of North Carolina's top fishing guides, including fishing boat captains Eddie Stuart, Fisher Culbreth, Wayne Freeman, and Jimmy Price, give their suggestions for catching flounder. Marsh also includes the new flounder fishing regulations.
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Record #:
6976
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Ralph Jensen's love of woodworking and hunting evolved into a career of handcrafting furniture, waterfowl and turkey calls, and duck decoys. Jensen discusses his work and creations.
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Record #:
7511
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North Carolina's Outer Banks have attracted hunters for over 150 years. Well into the 20th-century, the islands were dotted with lodges of gunning clubs, which have since been absorbed into national park lands. Waterfowl was the target of most of the clubs, but an introduced bird, the ring-necked pheasant, also provided sport. The only self-sustaining pheasant population in the state lives on the Outer Banks. Studies have failed to determine why they thrive there and nowhere else. The Cape Hatteras National Seashore does not allow pheasant hunting, but hunting is allowed in other island areas.
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Record #:
9698
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With the assistance of experienced bowyer, Basil Watts, Marsh describes how to make a wooden longbow.
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Record #:
10059
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One of the most-highly prized fishes in the state's coastal waters that attracts a devoted following is the grouper species, including the gag, misty, red, scamp, and snowy groupers. Marsh discusses fishing for grouper and some of the difficulties involved.
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Record #:
10305
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Marsh observes and describes an intriguing inhabitant in his back yard--a golden orb spider.
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Record #:
19265
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An advocacy group of disabled veterans new program puts wounded veterans in the field with North Carolina turkey hunting guides and has proven successful not only in the hunt but in providing a network of aid for disabled veterans.
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Record #:
19276
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It takes a lot of preparation, effort, and skill to chase and land North Carolina's smallest and fastest billfish.
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Record #:
12973
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A slam means taking everything possible, whether it is a card game, sports, such as tennis or baseball, and hunting and fishing. Hunters have slams, such as hunting all turkey species. Three squirrel species live in North Carolina - the red, gray, and fox. Marsh describes a squirrel slam to hunt these three types.
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