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21 results for Wood-carvers
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Record #:
2582
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Held yearly on Harkers Island, the Core Sound Decoy Festival brings together decoy carvers and wildlife artists who seek to preserve the heritage of the water-based way of life.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 6, Nov 1995, p31-32, il
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Record #:
3563
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Old handmade wooden decoys, carved by John Williams, Ken Burgess, and others who lived in Carteret, Currituck, Dare, and Hyde Counties, have become highly prized, collectable folk art.
Record #:
3566
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Carved duck decoys on Harkers Island once helped residents attract a food source. Now decoy carvers, including Curt Salter and Carl Huff, have raised the traditional utilitarian decoy to an art form and cottage industry.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1997, p10-15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
9447
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In 1901, Eleanor Vance and Charlotte Yale came to Asheville as missionaries after earlier graduating from the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago with the purpose of helping people in the mountain communities. They went on to teach valuable weaving and wood carving skills to many of the residents and eventually founded Biltmore Estate Industries, one of the country's most famous crafts enterprises. While weaving was done at Biltmore, hand-carved wooden toys were made by the Tryon Toy-Makers and Wood-Carvers Shop in Tryon. The most famous creation from this shop was Morris the Horse, which became a town trademark.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p114-116, 118, 120, 122, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9860
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Wood carvers along the waterways of eastern North Carolina have been using native birds as subjects for centuries, and today, interest in wildfowl carving is at an all time high. These skilled artisans produce works of great quality, but not great quantity, because of the time required in the creation of the finished product. Wiseman discusses the work of some of the carvers.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 4, Sept 1975, p14-16, il
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Record #:
9473
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Lewis describes working decoys, or decoys used for hunting as differentiated from those used for ornamental purposes, and some of their makers, including Lem and Lee Dudley of Knotts Island and John Williams and Ivey Stevens of Cedar Island.
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Record #:
9499
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Lewis continues his discussion of working decoys, or decoys used for hunting as differentiated from those used for ornamental purposes, and some of individuals who carved them.
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Record #:
9475
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Lewis continues his discussion of working decoys, or decoys used for hunting as differentiated from those used for ornamental purposes, and some of individuals who carved them.
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Record #:
9502
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Lewis concludes his discussion of working decoys, or decoys used for hunting as differentiated from those used for ornamental purposes, and some of individuals who carved them.
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Record #:
6044
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Wood carving enjoys a rich tradition in North Carolina. Wildlife animals are frequent subjects in the western part of the state, where Cherokees and the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown help keep the craft alive. Derks discusses the work of Cherokee carvers Goingback Chiltosky, Amanda Crowe, and Virgil Ledford.
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Record #:
9804
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Dean discusses the craft of two waterfowl hunters who make their own decoys. Neal Conoley, Jr. has been carving since 1967 and Stuart Critcher since 1945.
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Record #:
26947
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The Wake County Wildlife Club is hosting the 14th Annual Wildlife Art Show and Sale in Raleigh this December. The show will feature wildlife carvings of Joe Chambers. Recently, Joe produced a life size pair of whitetail deer heads, a buck and a doe.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept/Oct 1982, p10, il, por
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Record #:
2568
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To preserve and to make people aware of the coastal waterfowling tradition, citizens on Harkers Island hold a yearly Core Sound Decoy festival. Proceeds fund a waterfowl museum.
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Record #:
6976
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Ralph Jensen's love of woodworking and hunting evolved into a career of handcrafting furniture, waterfowl and turkey calls, and duck decoys. Jensen discusses his work and creations.
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Record #:
8667
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Kibler discusses the work of four North Carolina artisans who combine function and art to create turkey calls. They are Jeff Valentine (Wake Forest); Tony Quarino (Waxhaw); Ed Wynn (Hertford); and Don Carter (Merry Hill). Their calls are either adorned with paintings or constructed of unusual woods that provide a unique look.
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